neurofilament

(redirected from Neurofilaments)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.
Related to Neurofilaments: Neurofilament proteins

neurofilament

[‚nu̇·rō′fil·ə·mənt]
(physiology)
A type of intermediate filament, composed of three polypeptides (NF-L, NF-M, and NF-H), that helps support and strengthen the axons of nerve cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neurofilaments (NFs) in the mature central nervous system are composed of four subunits, light (NF-L), middle (NF-M), and high (NF-H), being about 200 kDa), and [alpha]-internexin.
Called neurofilament, this structure moves chemicals and cellular subunits to the far reaches of the nerve cell.
Further examination suggested that the restoration of vision depends on the loss of neurofilaments that hold the visual system in place.
26) Secondly, increased intracellular calcium may also damage microtubules and neurofilaments within the axon, thereby disrupting neural connectivity.
Arsenic inhibits neurofilament transport and induces perikaryal accumulation of phosphorylated neurofilaments: roles of JNK and GSK-3beta.
Immunohistochemical staining for synaptophysin, neurofilaments, and S-100 protein demonstrated a normal pattern of immunoreactivity.
Other such tests encountered during CDC health hazard evaluations include post-chelation urine testing for metal toxicity, use of peripheral neurofilaments for neurotoxic exposure, measurement of caffeine clearance for hepatotoxic exposure, and use of mold immunoassays for symptoms attributed to mold exposure.
Neurofilaments (NFs) are intraneuronal and axonal cytoskeletal framework proteins.
The axonal cytoskeleton, including myelin and the linear orientation of neurofilaments that keep anisotropy high in healthy white matter, can be perturbed with trauma or disease, including alcoholism, leading to diminished anisotropy, marking disruption of linearity (Arfanakis et al.
The proteins produced in the nucleus are transported via microtubules and neurofilaments to the synapses that contain mitochondria, which are responsible for energy production, and the synaptic vesicles that store the different neurotransmitters (Figure 3).