New Grub Street


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New Grub Street

place of ruthless contest among moneymongers. [Br. Lit.: New Grub Street, Magill I, 647–649]
See: Greed
References in periodicals archive ?
New Grub Street was an 1891 work by which novelist?
In fact, New Grub Street has nothing to say on the subject of the English aesthetic movement, on its proponents in general, or on the ridicule they faced in contemporary periodicals (most notoriously in Punch) for their avant-garde practices--only on the conflict that some realist novelists of the 1880s experienced between their desire to emulate the "Zola" school of French naturalism and the British public's hostility toward such tastes.
IF YOU THINK THE CASH NEXUS, CONSUMERISM AND debt reached their apotheosis this past year, take a look at New Grub Street, George Gissing's excoriating 1891 novel of the high Victorian era, in which every character is judged entirely by his or her yearly investment income.
While this 'physiological novel theory', as Dames terms it, has been almost entirely overlooked by a literary critical tradition still in thrall to the exclusive concern with production in the theoretical formulations of Henry James and George Lukacs, its concern with the role of factors such as intermittency, periodicity, discontinuity, and acceleration in print consumption had an important impact on the form of many canonical nineteenth-century novels, and Dames offers impressive close readings of The Newcomes, Daniel Deronda, The Egoist, and New Grub Street.
Gissing had a keen interest in social justice--he's best known as the author of novels such as New Grub Street, which realistically portrayed poverty in Victorian Britain--and chose to shun the Rome-Florence-Venice circuit, preferring to gain some experience of rural life while exploring the ruins of the classical past in the far south.
Orwell had read only a few of the novels, but "merely on the strength of New Grub Street, Demos, and The Odd Women I am ready to maintain that England has produced very few better novelists.
The present paper attempts to read Gissing's New Grub Street as the product of a crisis in the British literary system towards the end of the nineteenth century.
No better corrective may be found than George Gissing's New Grub Street, the The Information of its day (Amis had to have had it in mind) and still a startlingly pertinent picture of the literary life.
On 24 April 1887 he mid his brother Algernon about a planned-but-never-completed work called "Sandray the Sophist"--"mainly a satire on the modern cultivators of literature, & more particularly periodical literature"--and one sees Gissing's first tentative approach towards the world of New Grub Street, which he would turn to after his subsequent two novels.
A memoir of Allen's encounters with the leading writers of the day, As I Walked down New Grub Street, appeared in 1982.
Gissing's love of the classics, the hardships of his life, and his mixed idealism and pessimism are reflected in his best - known novels, The Nether World (1881) and New Grub Street.
Yet his personal life was, until the last few years, mostly unhappy; twice involved in miserable marriages, he led the life of near poverty and constant drudgery that he described in the novels New Grub Street, 3 vol.