New Nobility

New Nobility

 

a widely used name for the portion of the 16th- and 17th-century English nobility that, unlike the old feudal nobility, was able to adapt to the development of capitalist relations. It emerged as the main ally of the bourgeoisie during the English Civil War. The majority of the new nobility were of the minor and middle nobility, that is, members of the gentry.

References in classic literature ?
For new nobility is but the act of power, but ancient nobility is the act of time.
Therefore, O my brethren, a NEW NOBILITY is needed, which shall be the adversary of all populace and potentate rule, and shall inscribe anew the word "noble" on new tables.
Your CHILDREN'S LAND shall ye love: let this love be your new nobility,-- the undiscovered in the remotest seas
a new nobility is conferred in groves and pastures, and not in castles or by the sword-blade any longer.
McCahill argues that Martin V worked with the new nobility in Rome to promote their and the city's interests.
Although Gerber points to influential texts and widely publicized cases that served as pivots for these changes, he relates the arguments to larger socioeconomic and political forces, such as anxieties over competition with the new nobility of the robe in the seventeenth century and the spread of access to litigation in the eighteenth century.
Once political participation in the Great Council was restricted, membership in it defined a new nobility.
The New Nobility is an unnerving look at the real power behind the new Russia.
Most think of him as someone who spent his time with (often spurious) genealogies, making up coats of arms for the new nobility.
Entails in France had a strange evolution due to the political needs of Napoleon and his desire to attract a new nobility while undermining the old nobility, but were generally abolished by 1849.
Like those military training camps, Tarzan teaches ethnic American doughboys that they too can rise from subhuman status to a new nobility by means of raw talent, hard-knocks schooling, and old-school virtues.
He (the speaker) is humbler than the new nobility (to be