nuclear force

(redirected from Nucleon-nucleon interaction)
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nuclear force

[′nü·klē·ər ′fȯrs]
(nuclear physics)
That part of the force between nucleons which is not electromagnetic; it is much stronger than electromagnetic forces, but drops off very rapidly at distances greater than about 10-13 centimeter; it is responsible for holding the nucleus together.
References in periodicals archive ?
US) reproduce 28 papers by either or both, sometimes with others, published between 1967 and 2009 on nuclear many-body problems and the Brueckner G-matrix; low-momentum nucleon-nucleon interactions in a renormalization group approach; and Brown-Rho scaling in nuclei, nuclear matter, and neutron stars.
Theoretical descriptions of the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction are traditionally based on an effective meson exchange model in which the coupling constants for parity violating [pi], [rho], and [omega] meson exchanges set the scale for weak interaction effects and are uncertain to within factors of 2 to 3 on theoretical grounds [1].
Haxton, Parity Violation in the Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction, Ann.
Using the vector meson exchange model of the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction developed by DDH and a model dependent representation of the strong interaction, Avishai and Grange calculated the neutron spin rotation through a liquid parahydrogen target and obtained [3]
A precise knowledge of coherent scattering length is important for understanding the basic nucleon-nucleon interaction, charge independence and charge symmetry of the nuclear forces.
They highlight new results and developments in such topics as neutron electric dipole moment searches, neutron optics and interferometry, Standard Model tests using neutron beta decay, neutron facilities, neutron polarimetry, and nucleon-nucleon interactions.