Nuremberg Laws


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Nuremberg Laws

stripped Jews of citizenship and civil rights (1935). [Ger. Hist.: Wigoder, 458]
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1935, the Nuremberg Laws deprived German Jews of their citizenship.
Authors discuss the progression from the conservative German judiciary and career opportunism to the anti-Semitic Nuremberg laws and bypass of the legal system altogether.
Due to the passing of the anti-Semitic Nuremberg Laws in 1935, his father was briefly interned in a concentration camp.
After the 1935 rally, Hitler ordered the Reichstag to convene in the city to pass the anti-Semitic Nuremberg laws, which revoked German citizenship of all Jews.
The 1935 Nuremberg Laws prohibited marriage and sexual relations between Jews and non-Jews; later laws forced couples to undergo medical examinations to ensure they were not violating the Nuremberg Laws.
If I am to add something on the sidelines here about the harm inflicted upon us by the Nazi Germans, it would be the fact that they, in 1936 (the date of the Arab Revolt in Palestine), issued the Nuremberg Laws which withdrew German citizenship from 500 thousand German Jews, pushing many of them to immigrate to Palestine, both in secret and in public.
The laws which should protect these human beings are derived from the Nuremberg laws enacted after WWII, called the Common Rule.
In 1935, the Nuremberg Laws were drafted to protect "German Blood and German Honor" and to protect the "Genetic Health of the German People" from contamination from the genes of the Untermenshen.
Old statutes inherited from the Weimar Republic dealing with the "gypsy plague" were buttressed with new "scientific" information distinguishing between pure gypsies, half gypsies, and one-quarter gypsies: a counterpart to the anti-Jewish Nuremberg laws.
1935: The Nuremberg Laws were passed in Germany, outlawing Jews and making the Swastika the country's official flag.
The most sympathetic of the three defendants is Ernst Janning (compellingly portrayed by Burt Lancaster), a respected legal scholar who nonetheless sentenced seemingly innocent defendants to harsh punishment, even death, in enforcement of Hitler's Nuremberg laws.
Once the state becomes too prurient then we go the way of Nazi Germany's Nuremberg laws.