Nuristanis


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Nuristanis

 

the main population of Nuristan in Afghanistan; some also live in the Chitral region in Pakistan. The Nuristanis consist of a number of tribes (the Kati, Prasun, Vaigali, Ashkuni, and Vama). They speak languages of the Indo-Iranian group. They number about 100,000 (1970, estimate). The men engage in distant-pasture livestock raising, and the women in farming. Horticulture, viticulture, and crafts are also developed. In the past, neighboring Muslim peoples called the Nuristanis Kafirs (from Arabic kafir, “infidel”) and their country Kafiristan. In the late 19th century the Nuristanis were forcibly converted to Islam by the emir Abder-Rahman Khan; however, pre-Muslim dualistic religious concepts have been partially preserved among them.

REFERENCE

Narody Perednei Azii. Moscow, 1957.
References in periodicals archive ?
ix), and there can be no doubt that this volume will constitute a major advance in the field of Nuristani linguistics.
The happy result is that we have a practical yet linguistically sophisticated presentation, in which the study of Nuristani languages is brought up to date in the light of modern descriptive techniques.
For despite their having been separated, genetically speaking, from both groups since proto-historic times, the Nuristani languages still have a great deal in common with their neighboring families, especially with the Indic group, as a result of contact phenomena and common areal features, direct loans, and the survival of archaic words and structures.
She does, however, briefly address the long-standing controversy about the historical position of the Nuristani family vis-a-vis Indo-Iranian, provisionally accepting Morgenstierne's classification of Nuristani as a third, independent branch of Indo-Iranian, "allerdings als einen, der genetisch dem iranischen Zweig nahersteht" (p.
Nuristan Governor Tamim Nuristani told Pajhwok Afghan News the road construction formally began in Paroon.
Roads are the basic need which should be met," Nuristani stressed, urging higher-ups in Kabul to heed his demands.