biogeochemical cycle

(redirected from Nutrient cycling)

biogeochemical cycle

[‚bī·ō‚jē·ō′kem·ə·kəl ′sīkəl]
(geochemistry)
The chemical interactions that exist between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effects of aboveground browsing on fine root dynamics may be of particular significance to nutrient cycling processes in Alaskan interior forests where a significantly higher proportion of total ecosystem carbon fixed is allocated belowground relative to temperate forests (Ruess et al.
The Kilimanjaro eco system provides provisioning services, cultural services and supporting services (soil formation, nutrient cycling and primary production).
Several models have been used to show that nutrient cycling by herbivores is a plausible theoretical explanation for grazing optimization of plant primary production.
Litter fall and nutrient cycling in karri (Eucalyptus diversicolor F.
Community nutrient cycling and nutrient-use efficiency.
The topics discussed include plant growth-forms, succession in forest gaps, latitudinal diversity gradients, productivity and nutrient cycling, soil ecology, and white waters and black.
Experiments are the only way in which these and other possible causes of decreased productivity and nutrient cycling in montane tropical forests can be addressed directly.
Direct negative effects of herbivores on a subset of plant species can produce strong indirect effects on plant species composition, above- and belowground plant productivity, and nutrient cycling (e.
However, our understanding of the effects of fishes on nutrient cycling in lakes remains incomplete.
efficient nutrient cycling, associations between species distributions and soil characteristics) and identifies several priorities for research.
This volume, by a large assemblage of biologists and microbiologists, represents an attempt to fill this gap, with a synthesis of the status of knowledge in taxonomy, diversity, and nutrient cycling, in most habitats in the biosphere.
The third part examines canopy processes, including chapters on photosynthesis, herbivory, reproductive biology, and nutrient cycling.