biogeochemical cycle

(redirected from Nutrient cycling)

biogeochemical cycle

[‚bī·ō‚jē·ō′kem·ə·kəl ′sīkəl]
(geochemistry)
The chemical interactions that exist between the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract Notice: The University~s Department for Biological and Environmental Sciences research interests are broad, ranging from conservation and evolutionary ecology to environmental processes including carbon and nutrient cycling, river geomorphology and ecology, pollution and impact monitoring; and geoarchaeology, environmental history and palaeo-environments.
The diversity of microbial communities improves nutrient cycling which greatly affects the nutrient availability to plants.
On animal husbandry and nutrient cycling in the northern Hajar mountains, Eva Schlecht, from the University of Kassel, said livestock husbandry has been an important way of life for Oman's sedentary and semi-nomadic rural populations for millennia.
Insects also play a critical role in nutrient cycling and decomposing organic materials, which helps ensure ecosystem productivity.
The carbon fractions study was published in the Open Journal of Soil Science, and the nitrogen cycling study appeared in Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, both in 2012.
It seems to me that the way forward lies in using the essential principles of organic agriculture--the integration of nutrient cycling from animals to plants and back--in a modern scientific context.
Riverine systems are recognized for the role they play in providing a habitat for wildlife, nutrient cycling, waste and runoff repositories, and sustaining human development.
Dr Paula Roberts, of the School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, has collaborated with British Antarctic Survey on several polar research projects that focus specifically on understanding plant nutrient cycling in polar soils.
But with better foresight, with a planning strategy that included the bison--a natural ecosystem engineer--as wildlife we might well have seen a landscape with greater, more stable biodiversity, a landscape with better, more efficient nutrient cycling, and even a landscape that might have better sustained humans in the 21st century and beyond.
Without bamboo, the land dies': nutrient cycling and biogeochemistry of a Javanese bamboo talun-kebun system.
Nutrient cycling processes are mediated by soil organisms, hence forming a major component of the soil system and, therefore, greatly contributing to soil health [8].