Nymphalidae


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Related to Nymphalidae: nymphalid butterfly, Heliconiinae

Nymphalidae

[nim′fal·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The four-footed butterflies, a family of lepidopteran insects in the superfamily Papilionoidea; prothoracic legs are atrophied, and the well-developed patagia are heavily sclerotized.

Nymphalidae

 

a family of butterflies with a wingspread ranging from 2.5 to 18 cm. The coloration of the wings, whose margins are often angular or crenated, is bright and variegated; the upper and lower parts of the wings may vary in color. The forelegs are reduced and clawless. The larvae are covered with dendritic spines or cutaneous protuberances. The cocoons often have a metallic sheen and are suspended upside down.

There are approximately 2,000 species of nymphalids, distributed throughout the world. They are particularly numerous and varied in the tropics. The following species are typical of the moderate latitudes of the northern hemisphere: Apatura, Neptis, Nigella, Limenitis, Vanessa, Melitaea, and Argynnis. The USSR has approximately 140 species, including the painted lady (Vanessa cardui), the tortoise shell (Aglais urticae), and the mourning cloak (Nymphalis antiopa). Nymphalid larvae feed on herbaceous and, less frequently, woody plants. They do not cause serious damage.

References in periodicals archive ?
Three families of butterflies can be easily distinguished from each other, as Nymphalidae have predominantly orange or pale brown colours, reduced forelegs, large, prominent knobs at the tips of their antennae; Papilionidae are diurnal and heliophilous (sun loving), medium to large in size; Pieridae are predominantly white, creamy, yellow or light orange colours and are predominantly black or dark colours With distinct spots underside and upper side of wings.
some Pieridae, Riodinidae, Hesperiidae, Nymphalidae subfamilies such as Limenitidinae, Cyrestinae and Apaturinae, and the tribe Ithomiini) are frequently captured on baits traps (although occurring in very low frequencies).
El trabajo comparativo entre regiones y localidades se desarrollo con las familias Papilionidae, Pieridae y Nymphalidae, por el buen conocimiento taxonomico y biogeografico que se tiene de ellas (Llorente et al.
Se evaluaron cambios y diversidad de las mariposas en un paisaje con manejo forestal del sur de Mexico, recolectandose 143 especies pertenecientes a 102 generos de cinco familias, siendo Nymphalidae la mas diversa (54 especies; 38%).
La familia Nymphalidae contiene la mayor riqueza seguida de Lycaenidae.
For example, butterflies in the large family Nymphalidae are called brushfoots because they all have short, brushy forelegs.
Other Nymphalidae, as well as some Pieridae and Papillionidae, that are perfectly edible present very similar colors to those of the monarch butterfly, leading potential predators to avoid them.
The very large family Orchidaceae is only used by a few genera in Lycaenidae (Hypolycaena and Chliaria in Theclinae) and Nymphalidae (Faunis in Amathusiinae).
They were grouped in three Superfamilies and included in 6 families representing 23 species: Papilionoidea: Pieridae (2 species), Lycaenidae (1 species), Riodinidae (2 species), Nymphalidae (6 species); Hesperioidea: Hesperiidae (11 species); and Noctuoidea: Erebidae (1 species).
The largest representative family of butterflies and moths from India is Nymphalidae with 450 species (Varshney, 1993).
Maza, 1984 Lieinix nemesis nayaritensis Llorente, 1984 Perente charops leonilae Llorente, 1986 Perente charops sphocra Draudt, 1931 Perente charops nigricans Joicey & Talbot, 1928 Riodinidae Enselasia anrantiaca anrnm Callaghan, Llorente & Luis, 2007 Rhetns arcins bentelspacheri Llorente, 1988 Exoplisia aznleja Callaghan, Llorente & Luis, 2007 Mesene jimena Callaghan, Llorente & Luis, 2011 Lamphiotes velazqnezi (Beutelspacher, 1976) Nymphalidae Opsiphanes blythekitzmillerae Austin & A.
The Blonde Glider or Coast Glider is a butterfly of the Nymphalidae family.