Hippocratic oath

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Hippocratic oath

an oath taken by a doctor to observe a code of medical ethics supposedly derived from that of Hippocrates (?460--?337), Greek physician commonly regarded as the father of medicine

Hippocratic oath

ethical code of medicine. [Western Culture: EB, 11: 827]
References in periodicals archive ?
D 1995 Restatement of the Oath of Hippocrates, endorsed by 35 interfaith ethicists, asserts:
excerpt from a modern substitute for the Oath of Hippocrates, the "Oath of Lasagna" (by Dr.
Sylvia Cruess, an endocrinologist and associate professor of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, said to remember the "do no harm" oath of Hippocrates when you're confronted by a stranger asking for medical advice in a public setting.
Sylvia Cruess, an endocrinologist and associate professor of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, suggested remembering the "do no harm" oath of Hippocrates when you are confronted by a stranger asking for medical advice in a public setting.
Actually, it would be a mistake to consider the entire Oath of Hippocrates either current or irrelevant.
So it is that we, who are not doctors, are well justified in our confidence that the oath of Hippocrates is and will continue to be honoured throughout the medical profession.
It has become the custom to allow students to choose their oath, and a remarkable trend has been the renewed prominence of the ancient Oath of Hippocrates in preference to the several others, which are every bit as idealistic, often more complete and conceptual, and certainly express particulars more in keeping with the beliefs of most of the community.
And see ABA Informal Opinion 89-1530; Oath of Hippocrates, Nuland, supra note 9.
One part of the Oath of Hippocrates still applies: the Curse.