obelisk

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Related to Obelisks: Hatshepsut

obelisk

(ŏb`əlĭsk), slender four-sided tapering monument, usually hewn of a single great piece of stone, terminating in a pointed or pyramidal top. Among the ancient Egyptians these monoliths were commonly of red granite from Syene and were dedicated to the sun god. They were placed in pairs before the temples, one on either side of the portal. The greatest number erected in any one place was in Heliopolis, but eventually almost every temple entrance was flanked by a pair of them. Down each of the four faces, in most cases, ran a line of deeply incised hieroglyphs and representations, setting forth the names and titles of the Pharaoh. The cap, or pyramidion, was sometimes sheathed with copper or other metal. Obelisks of colossal size were first raised in the XII dynasty. Of those still standing in Egypt, one remains at Heliopolis and two at Al Karnak, one from the time of Thutmose I and one of Queen Hatshepsut which is estimated to be 97.5 ft (29.7 m) high. Many of the historic shafts have been carried from Egypt, notably one of the reign of Ramses II from Luxor, now in the Place de la Concorde, Paris, and Cleopatra's NeedlesCleopatra's Needles,
name in popular use for two obelisks of red granite from Egypt. Originally erected at Heliopolis (c.1475 B.C.) by Thutmose III, they were transported to Alexandria (c.14 B.C.) under Augustus and in the 19th cent.
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 in London and New York. Others are in Rome and Florence. In the United States two familiar structures of obelisk form (though not monoliths) are the Washington and the Bunker Hill monuments.

Obelisk

A four-sided stone shaft, either monolithic or jointed, tapering to a pyramidal top.

Obelisk

 

a four-sided stone pillar, usually of square section, that tapers as it rises and ends in a pyramid. Obelisks were widespread in ancient Egypt, where they were erected as monuments, usually next to palaces and temples. Monolithic obelisks exported from Egypt were used in European city planning as important spatial elements in the design of architectural complexes. An example of such use is the obelisk on Piazza del Popolo in Rome, erected in 1589 by the architect D. Fontana. The obelisk is a popular form of monument; in Russia it has been in use since the 18th century.

obelisk

[′äb·ə‚lisk]
(architecture)
A four-sided pillar, tapering toward the top.
(mathematics)
A frustrum of a regular, rectangular pyramid.

obelisk

obelisk
1. A monumental, four-sided stone shaft, usually monolithic and tapering to a pyramidal tip.
2. In Egyptian art, such a shaft mostly covered with hieroglyphs; originally erected as a cult symbol to the sun god.

obelisk

a stone pillar having a square or rectangular cross section and sides that taper towards a pyramidal top, often used as a monument in ancient Egypt
References in periodicals archive ?
As the twentieth century saw the rise of additional commemorative obelisks, the Egyptian Revival became ensconced in American national identity.
The obelisk of Pharaoh Thutmose III, stands in New York's Central Park, the only monumental obelisk from ancient Egypt in the US.
Even today their simply named, "Obelisk I" and "Obelisk II" garden obelisks are bestsellers in Europe, USA and Japan.
Amongst the ruins, Poggio considers that which survives nonetheless, and notes that the city and its environs were still adorned with the pyramids of Caius Cestius and the Meta Romuli, as well as with several obelisks "which were transported from Egypt with great effort and expense, as Pliny records" (p.
Not only did he achieve the feat with the use of only 907 men and 75 horses (compared to 8,362 men used by the Egyptians to move and erect an obelisk in 1150 BC, not including the 900 who died in the process), but thereafter became a kind of expert subcontractor, raising further fallen obelisks in Rome, and even installing one for the Medici family in Florence.
What makes the Egyptian presence in Rome so remarkable is the fact that of the thirty-five ancient obelisks remaining worldwide, fourteen (4) of the 'monoliths of Aswan granite', as Pliny described them, (5) can still be seen in the streets of Rome.
Recalling that the emperors of ancient Rome had adorned that city with statues looted from Egypt, he sought to emulate them by ordering that his henchmen in Italian-occupied Ethiopia send him one of the remarkable obelisks from Aksum, in northern Ethiopia, which dated back to the early 4th century AD.
The 1, 700-year-old monument which weighs 150 tons and 24 meters high, is one of a group of six obelisks erected at Axum when Ethiopia adopted Christianity in the 4th century A.
The Eastman CABs were used on the statue itself as well as on the stone column of the monument and the four granite obelisks at its base.
During the New Kingdom, obelisks were erected in pairs in front of temple gateways - the first part of the temple on which the sun's rays fell at dawn and the last to be illuminated at sunset.
Likewise, the World War II monument, rushed to completion after badgering from big swingers like Tom Hanks and Bob Dole, is a clunky checklist of a memorial that overwhelms with an assault of fountains, flags, plaques, obelisks, and concrete.
The exterior redesign will feature an elegant French curved cobblestone paved driveway lighted with obelisks, allowing vehicles to pull up alongside the building entrance, and a new Porte Cochere canopy at the doorway.