Object of Law

Object of Law

 

social relationships which, in given socioeconomic and political conditions, are subject, from the point of view of the ruling class, to legal regulation (in a socialist society, from the point of view of all the people). Political, labor, economic, land, and other relationships are objects of law. By indicating through legal norms the proper and permissible behavior of members of society and the rights and obligations of state agencies, officials, and citizens as participants in regulated social relationships, the state encourages them to choose social behavior that serves the interests of the ruling class. The term “object of law” also denotes things (objects) that give rise to social relations regulated by a particular branch of law, for example, in the USSR a residential building may be an object of the right to personal property.

References in periodicals archive ?
The object of law thus is against the crime, not the speech per se, as the intent to do harm becomes the basis for arrest.
The human body cannot represent an object of law and the human, assimilated to the physical person, cannot be but a subject of law and not an object of law.
government was in question'' and ``nobody in that day and age wanted to be the object of law enforcement attention,'' Jordan said.