objective probabilities

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objective probabilities

[əb′jek·tiv ‚präb·ə′bil·əd·ēz]
(statistics)
Probabilities determined by the long-run relative frequency of an event. Also known as frequency probabilities.
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To what extent does the gap in teacher expectations reflect real differences in the objective probability of college completion?
The DAG is the agent~s "type" it represents how he systematically distorts any objective probability distribution into a subjective belief.
The author underlies that the main difficulty in interpreting results arising from the Neyman-Pearson approach resides in the distinction between subjective and objective probability.
We cannot clone physically, emotionally, intellectually identical Johns, with identical life experiences, in large numbers, have them smoke, and see how many of them would develop lung cancer--the only way of determining empirically verifiable objective probability.
When asked about their chance of having a genetic predisposition to HD, untested individuals report perceived probabilities that are much lower than their objective probability.
The different scenarios that led to this question gave rise to a notion of objective probability based on the concept of expectation and, then, on an essentially dual interpretation that assimilated the probability, either to a deductive expression based on the symmetry of the aleatorism inherent to some events-classical definition-either to the frequency with which certain phenomena are verified-frequentist definition.
Then they look at objective probability and long-term frequency, and present a structured approach to making decisions that are consistent with the decision makers' estimates of uncertainty and risk attitude.
Application of the Objective Probability of Bias Standard to Justice Benjamin's Failure to Recuse Himself
This objective probability would generally be obtained by repeated measurements of some kind (tossing a coin is a simple example), and the relative frequency of occurrence of a favorable result (heads or tails) would be an estimate of a probability.
Uninformed bettors are defined as those whose objective expected return is negative, as they bet on horses whose objective probability of winning is less than the price.
Your chance of surviving is your objective probability of surviving.

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