Obshchina

(redirected from Obschina)

Obshchina

 

(1) A revolutionary journal, of which one issue was published in London in September 1870. Its editors were S. G. Nechaev and V. I. Serebrenikov. The second issue, published in early 1871, was destroyed by Nechaev.

(2) A revolutionary journal published in Geneva from January to December 1878 by a group of Russian Bakuninist Narodniki (Populists). Nine issues were published (circulation, 1,000). Its editors were P. B. Aksel’rod, N. I. Zhukovskii, D. A. Klements, and Z. K. Ralli. S. M. Kravchinskii, V. N. Cherkezov, L. G. Deich, and Ia. V. Stefanovich were regular contributors. Also among those associated with the journal were M. P. Dragomanov and E. Reclus. The journal analyzed the results of the “going to the people” movement and published materials related to the Trial of 193, including I. N. Myshkin’s speech. Associated with Land and Liberty (Zemlia i Volia), the journal endeavored to unite various Populist currents “into a social-revolutionary party.”

References in periodicals archive ?
Orlando Figes recuerda que la obschina o mir "testimonia [.
Durante mas de una decada, la obschina se reconvirtio en la forma dominante de organizacion social y economica en el campo y en el principal instrumento de igualdad social (15).
Now the question is: can the Russian obschina, though greatly undermined, yet a form of primeval common ownership of land, pass directly to the higher form of Communist common ownership?
Vera Zasulich, the second Russian translator of the Manifesto and at the time a Narodniki activist, asked Marx to intervene on the question of whether or not the insights in Volume One of Capital were applicable to Russia and whether Russia had to undergo capitalist development prior to a socialist revolution, as the Russian Marxists contended, or whether it could directly achieve a communist society on the basis of the Russian commons, or village commune, obschina.
Este componente poblacional original de San Javier tuvo una fuerte influencia religiosa, ya que estos primeros inmigrantes colonos integraban un grupo escindido de la Iglesia Ortodoxa llamado Novo Izrailskaya Obschina (Comunidad Nuevo Israel), que profesaba--entre otras cuestiones--una modalidad de trabajo comunitario de la tierra.