Obstinacy


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Obstinacy

Obtuseness (See DIMWITTEDNESS.)
Oddness (See ECCENTRICITY.)
Oldness (See AGE, OLD.)
Balmawhapple
bullheaded, blundering Scotch laird. [Br. Lit.: Waverley]
Deans, Davie
stern and righteous Presbyterian. [Br. Lit.: The Heart of Midlothian]
Gradgrind, Thomas
rigid “man of realities.” [Br. Lit.: Hard Times]
Grant, Ulysses S.
(1822–1885) 18th U.S. president; nicknamed “Unconditional Surrender.” [Am. Hist.: Kane, 523]
Jorkins
intractable, unyielding lawyer. [Br. Lit.: David Copperfield]
Mistress Mary
known for being “quite contrary.” [Nurs. Rhyme: Baring-Gould, 31]
mule
symbol of obstinacy: “stubborn as a mule.” [Folklore: Jobes, 462]
Pharaoh
refuses to heed Moses’s mandate from God. [O.T.: Exodus 7:13, 22–23, 8:32, 9:7, 12]
References in classic literature ?
That evening at supper Fraulein Cacilie, redder than usual, with a look of obstinacy on her face, took her place punctually; but Herr Sung did not appear, and for a while Philip thought he was going to shirk the ordeal.
said Miss Pink, asserting the most immovable obstinacy under the blandest politeness of manner.
There's a power of obstinacy in young women,' she remarked.
With the obstinacy of his order, he protested against being dragged in a chosen direction.
 The popular type and exponent of obstinacy is the mule, a most
I can't say I do," answered Horace, in the positive tone of a man whose obstinacy is proof against every form of appeal that can be addressed to him.
Nicholl, disgusted by this obstinacy, tried to tempt Barbicane by offering him every chance.
For her part, she could not help thinking it was an encouragement to vice; but that she knew too much of the obstinacy of mankind to oppose any of their ridiculous humours.
He read the leading article, in which it was maintained that it was quite senseless in our day to raise an outcry that radicalism was threatening to swallow up all conservative elements, and that the government ought to take measures to crush the revolutionary hydra; that, on the contrary, "in our opinion the danger lies not in that fantastic revolutionary hydra, but in the obstinacy of traditionalism clogging progress," etc.
He had not the vice of obstinacy, and he knew when to abandon a theory.
Begbie for obstinacy never had existed yet, and never would exist again.
Then I do,' said Sikes, more in the spirit of obstinacy than because he had any real objection to the girl going where she listed.