occidental

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occidental

[‚äk·sə′dent·əl]
(lapidary)
Property of a gemstone which is of an inferior quality (grade, luster, or value) or is an inferior variety.
Property of a substitute gemstone that is misrepresented as being the genuine gem.
References in periodicals archive ?
Connecting social structures to intellectual cultures and practices and promoting comparisons that are methodologically sound, the overall contribution of this important and intellectually exciting book is to initiate a much needed research program that promises to move the discussion beyond the shrill polarized positions orchestrated by the Orientalists and the Occidentalists.
They also exemplify the fortunate others of Lewis's Occidentalist trope--the lack of curiosity said to characterize the Muslim perception of the Christian others of Europe.
Elements of Occidentalist attitudes ate already observable in Russian critiques of Mahmud II's reforms and would become even more pronounced during the Tanzimat period.
In 1995, Xiomei Chen offers a similar nuanced approach to Occidentalism when she argues that two Occidentalist discourses co-exist in contemporary China.
The study of Occidentalist practices necessitates a thorough analysis of the paradigm of representation that generates these "bounded units.
While American and Chinese nationalists produce Orientalist and Occidentalist discourses based on similar epistemologies of difference, other Americans and Chinese can construct discourses of similarity.
She is interested in the dilemma of "oscillating between the attempt to escape orientalism and ethnic ascription and the simultaneous establishment of occidentalist stereotypes" (p.
Although my training and research inclinations have been occidentalist, without alloy, for most of my career, it has become obvious to me in recent years that, if I am to advance my understanding of my research specialization, the contemporary novel, I will need to look further a field than North America and Western Europe.
For those holding extreme versions of Occidentalist ideas, the central conclusion is that the West, and the United States in particular, are so incorrigibly bad that they must be destroyed.
Xiaomei Chen argues that Shakespeare plays the role of a "counter Other" in mainland China's Occidentalist theatre in the post-Mao era (43-58).
Finally, such frameworks serve to reproduce orientalism and its equally problematic occidentalist reversals.
Mooney and Young's contribution compares the stereotypical imaginaries of occidentalist terrorism with orientalist "antiterrorism terrorism.