Ockham's razor


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Ockham's razor

[′äk·əmz ′rā·zər]
(science and technology)
The doctrine that unnecessary assumptions should be avoided in formulating hypotheses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Concerning her example of the key, I argued that her position goes against Ockham's razor and contradicts Lewis's and her definitions of intrinsic and extrinsic properties.
He applied the venerable principle of parsimony to the arguments of bis adversaries, one and all, so single-mindedly that the principle came to be associated with him and came to be called Ockham's razor.
A keen awareness of Ockham's razor will help guide us on our quest to understand the nature of living systems and their behavior under various environmental conditions.
Barnett, by contrast, does not use elegance, parsimony, or Ockham's razor to choose among competing accounts of a given phenomenon.
Applying Ockham's Razor again, let us cut away entities that are not central to teaching.
The cutting away of an elaborate hierarchy of ideas and concepts in the attempt to grasp the truth is popularly known as Ockham's razor.
We believe our initiative applies the old-world wisdom of the Ockham's razor theory to the virtualized data center of tomorrow by offering the simplest approach to automating network management in the data center since it relies on common scripting languages and standards-based protocols that enable customers to leverage existing skill sets and eliminate the need to learn a new set of software development tools.
Ockham's Razor are really pushing the boundaries of circus and aerial theatre, but Charlotte reckons it is more dangerous riding a bicycle than crawling up a giant Perspex box.
Ockham's Razor is renowned for creating daring physical theatre on aerial equipment specially created for each new show.
Ockham's Razor will be showcasing their new work The Mill at The Dream Factory, Shelley Avenue, on October 8.
Here he uses Ockham's razor to point out that just because there is an essential predicate picking out a function, there is no reason to posit a separate substantial form for each such predicate.
Since the application of paradigms from other disciplines to historical questions sometimes proves illuminating, I kept Ockham's razor in its sheath, hoping to find some empirical support for the author's contention in the second chapter on the myth of Venice.