offshore

(redirected from Off-shore)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial.

offshore

based or operating abroad in places where the tax system is more advantageous than that of the home country

offshore

[′ȯf¦shȯr]
(geology)
The comparatively flat zone of variable width extending from the outer margin of the shoreface to the edge of the continental shelf.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Fallon said that as more off-shore turbines are built, the cost to build them will decrease - and will eventually see household bills come down.
The off-shore site is one of a dozen around the UK where wind farms could be built in the next 10 years, as the UK Government plans a shift towards renewables to enable it to meet international emissions targets.
So, does off-shore IT development still make good commercial sense?
2006) report (based on an examination of eight industries) that an estimated eleven percent (11%) of service jobs could be completed remotely in off-shore locations as the specific tasks require "neither substantial local knowledge nor physical or complex interaction between an employee and customers or colleagues" (Farrell et al.
In addition, uncertainty is likely to remain high with respect to the off-shoring relationship from a subsidiary respective, as there is probably competition for off-shore projects among subsidiaries located in medium and low wage countries, demand by high wage country MNC units may oscillate and off-shore projects may be risky (technological uncertainty).
In 2006 the number of Slovenia countries that off-shore their production has risen up to 28 %.
Kearns was previously a director of Kearns Machine Tools and more recently via an off-shore company, owner of the property occupied by Woolworths in Lichfield.
As an example, where Ross University was one of several off-shore institutions feeding graduates into American medicine, today there are more than a dozen such universities, and this method of entry has become quite acceptable.
Richard Rather, retail analyst for Seymour Pierce, said these three off-shore stores were likely to be sold next because, from a logistics point of view, they were detracting from Morrisons' core turnaround objectives.
He argued that jobs lost to moves off-shore are replaced by higher quality, more skilled, often more secure jobs in Britain.
Off-shore credit card schemes are another form of abuse.
Outsourcing raises the standard of living for those off-shore people and their countries, but at the expense of our working class and gross national product.