Oldham, John

Oldham, John

(ōl`dəm), c.1600–1636, colonist in New England, b. England. A trader, he emigrated to Plymouth in 1623 but was banished (1624) because of his opposition to the strict government. Later he was involved in establishing the unsuccessful settlement on Cape Ann (1626), several of the settlements in the Massachusetts Bay colony, and Wethersfield, Conn. His murder by the Pequot on Block Island was one of the events leading to the Pequot War (1637).

Oldham, John,

1653–83, English poet and satirist. His best-known works are the ironical Satires against the Jesuits (1681) and A Satire against Virtue (1679). He was much admired by Dryden, who wrote the beautiful "To the Memory of Mr. Oldham," included in Oldham's collected works (1684).

Bibliography

See study by P. Hammond (1984).

References in periodicals archive ?
He describes the colony of Charlestown, the first settler of Boston (William Blaxton), the bridges over the river, Cambridge, Brookline, the Back Bay, Brighton, Tory Row, Watertown, Newton, the Bemis Mills, Auburndale-on-the-Charles and Norumbega, Waltham, Hemlock Gorge and the Upper Falls, the Lower Falls, Dedham, upriver towns, the Charles River Basin, and other places, as well as the roles of John Oldham, John Eliot, and Francis and Freelan Stanley.
Back row (from left): Alan Bull, Derek Oldham, John de Voisey, John Harris, John Bardon, Nicky Taylor, Bill Stevens, Chas Powner, Barry Chislett, Phil Whitehouse.
Derek Oldham, John Smith, Rowland Clegg; Front row: Bill Gardner, Linda Fortescue, Sylvia Dixon, Alan Collins, David Farndon, Doreen Burdett, Susan Harrison, Eileen Brett, Christine Amos, Eileen Warner, ?