Omoo


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Omoo

Polynesian word for an island rover. [Am. Lit.: Omoo]
References in periodicals archive ?
Emi o ni gbagba aje otosi/Ti o maa laki sa jini jkaye/emi o le gbagba eye/Ti i figba ori omoo tiwon on mumi/ emi o le seye kannakanna erujeje [50]Eye afeje eniyan soro l'Awe/Tori boso ile ba pomo re/Oun o ni gbenu aye ra si/Aje to fase agba pomo ajeji / O pe ni, o ya ni / Oluwa re a rahun gbehin/Odo to ba seesi gbegi nibuu o /Ara rere ko ni ao fi lo/Ojo sigidi ba wemi lodo /Ni o tun rile aye mo [60]/Bi mo ba gbagba aje aye tan/Mo rohun ti n ba maafajee mi se o/Aje aremo, Aje ogbagba.
His star had fallen from the firmament of American authors after Typee (more than 16,320 copies sold in his lifetime, on both sides of the Atlantic) and Omoo (13,335 copies).
Particularly compelling is the reclamation of the unjustly neglected Omoo, which Hayes positions as an important and "very funny book" (33) in the Melville canon; in his discussion of the significance of the "flaneur" for the novel and in his careful distinction of the "beachcomber" and the "rover" (35), which clarifies distinctions between Typee and Omoo, Hayes opens up possibilities for further critical investigation.
Melville didn't have two Moby-Dicks, but I pity the reader who can't exult in "The Encantadas" or in Omoo.
43) In a review of Typee and Melville's second novel, Omoo, Horace Greeley wrote of Melville being "positively diseased in moral tone, and will be fairly condemned as dangerous reading for those of immature intellects and unsettled principles.
In contrast, Herman Melville's autobiographical novels Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life (1846) and Omoo (1847) recognize that missionaries have improved morality, translated the Bible into the vernacular, and established churches and schools in the Marquesas, Sandwich, and Society Islands, but Melville laments their racial prejudice and insensitivity to local traditions, arguing that "they had exaggerated the evils of Paganism, in order to enhance the merit of their own disinterested labours.
Beginning with a chapter on biography, the book discusses Melville's contributions to American literature, his influence, genres, and major works: Typee, Omoo, Mardi, Redburn, White-Jacket, Moby-Dick, Pierre, The Confidence Man, and Billy Budd, in addition to his short fiction, serialized novels, and poetry.
He returned to make a name for himself writing the popular but controversial South Sea adventure novels Typee (1846) and Omoo (1847), which deal, to no small degree, with intensely emotional, and in some cases obviously sexual, relationships between men.
Melville's early commercial success as a writer of South Sea experiences whetted his appetite for literary immortality, but after Omoo he wanted to spring free of the restraints imposed by John Murray, his English publisher whose Home and Colonial Library published only works of true adventures.
2 NS Kiiwaado de, nihon toka fasshon toka iretara, ippai dete kuru to omoo yo.
AT FIRST GLANCE, the reader might consider AM 00 to be a romance of the South Seas, like Omoo, but the last two characters of the title are zeroes, and nothing could be farther from the truth.
Smith Lemeunier considers Melville's difficult sentences in The Confidence-Man, suggesting that the syntactical complexities of its prose may be aggressively directed at the readers: "It is not improbable that, as in Pierre, a reckless perversity made him adopt a style deliberately calculated to displease his audience" (24)--certainly the same audience, popular and critical, who damned him for his novels beginning with and following Mardi and longed for him to return to South Sea adventures like Typee and Omoo.