opium of the people

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opium of the people

Marx’s classic metaphor for religion. [Ger. Hist.: Critique of Hegel’s “Philosophy of Right”]
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And a perfect example of this is how Karl Marx is quoted today as saying: 'religion is the opiate of the people.
The Mujahideen's jihad against the atheistic Soviet invaders confirmed the reality that had already marked the Islamic Revolution in Iran: Religion may be the opiate of the people, as Marx famously observed, but it has been and remains one of the most powerful historical forces in the modern world.
In the Cold War, we had a stand-off between on one side the United States -- "one nation under God" -- and on the other the Soviet Union, which upheld the teaching of Karl Marx that "religion is the opiate of the people.
Some topics discussed are sports as the opiate of the people, class and masculinity in Fat City and The Game, and the sports fictions of Michael Chabon.
He, along with other deniers of God like Marx and Freud, maintained that religion was a force that crushed the will to live; it was an opiate of the people that held them down; a grand delusion that kept them from facing reality.
The paramilitary's violence succeeds and soccer continues to serve as "the opiate of the people," the work suggests, because memory or the act of remembering does not occupy a higher plane than it currently does.
Religion and psychiatry have sometimes mixed like oil and water, in part because Freud viewed religion as contributing to neurosis and being what some have called an opiate of the people.
Dubai Religion is not the opiate of the people, as the communist philosopher Karl Marx famously said, but the misunderstanding of religion could be, according to the host of popular Arab TV show Khawater (thoughts).
But, as Karl Marx put it, religion is also the opiate of the people.
Used by the pigs to distract the other animals, who instantly become mesmerized by its black-and-white images of pretty actresses and modern appliances, television is a more powerful opiate of the people than Marx ever dreamed of.
Baseball writer Jerome Holtzman once wrote, ``If sports have become the opiate of the people, as charged, .