social solidarity

(redirected from Organic solidarity)

social solidarity

the integration, and degree or type of integration, manifested by a society or group. The basis of social solidarity differs between simple societies and more complex societies. Thus in simple societies it is often based on relations of KINSHIP, and direct mutual relations and shared values. In relations between non-kin, and in more complex societies, social solidarity has various bases, e.g. see MECHANICAL AND ORGANIC SOLIDARITY. Whether in more complex societies social solidarity requires 'shared values’, integrative RITUAL, etc., is debated (see CONSENSUS, DOMINANT IDEOLOGY THESIS, RELIGION, CIVIL RELIGION).
References in periodicals archive ?
The advance of organic solidarity would be related to the division and specialization of labor and would correspond to the restitutive Law.
Durkheim coined two types of solidarity, namely the mechanical solidarity, belonging to primitive societies, and the organic solidarity, characterizing the more developed societies emerged after the division of labour (Durkheim, 1967).
He argued that there is mechanical solidarityand there is organic solidarity.
However, societies classified as organic solidarity are normally characterised by larger population groupings, and therefore inevitably involve more complex forms of division of labour.
But what is urgently needed is a strong complementary focus on job creation to preserve and foster Durkheim's organic solidarity.
As Simpson infers, there is for Wordsworth "no real organic solidarity, no worshipful commemoration of a supportive national culture" (65).
Beside giving a detailed picture of the structure and composition of the Council of the National Salvation Front, the author puts forward solid arguments for fact that even though apparently the general platform of the NFS was based on a reformed socialism associated to a socialist model of the market economy, in reality it was a non-ideological party appealing only to the creation of a general consensus and an organic solidarity.
Daniel Farber has remarked upon a similar position Fletcher advanced regarding the idea of American nationhood following the Civil War: "Rather than being based on the voluntary association of a social compact, nationhood involves a kind of organic solidarity based on the `bonds of memory.
By contrast, the organic solidarity of the advanced society is a natural one, caused by the necessity of cooperation that is the result of the division of labor, (42) which exists in only a weak sense in a primitive society.
There is a tumour here; it is malignant, if not cancerous to the organic solidarity of family, community and society.
He evokes a vision of an organic solidarity resting upon intermediate associations, a pluralistic state, associative democracy, and behavioural controls that emerge from the individual's extensive social involvement and political participation.