Halocarbon

(redirected from Organohalide)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

halocarbon

[¦ha·lō¦kär·bən]
(organic chemistry)
A compound of carbon and a halogen, sometimes with hydrogen.

Halocarbon

Class of man-made chemicals, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), whose heat-trapping properties are among the most damaging of the greenhouse gases. This, coupled with their tendency to remain in the atmosphere for hundreds of years, has resulted in limits on their use. Halocarbons are most commonly used in refrigeration, air conditioning, and electrical systems, as well as blowing agents in some foam insulation products.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sample topics include: stereochemistry, organohalides, structure determination using mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy, corbonyl condensation reactions, the four types of biomolecule, the organic chemistry of metabolic pathways, and synthetic polymers, among others.
The occurrence of organohalides in chlorinated drinking water.
Their report, published in the June 21 SCIENCE, describes the experimental growth of a white rot fungus in glucose solutions containing different organohalides --carbon-containing compounds with attached chlorine or bromine atoms.
Interactions of persistent environmental organohalides with the thyroid hormone system: mechanisms and possible consequences for animal and human health.