Halocarbon

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halocarbon

[¦ha·lō¦kär·bən]
(organic chemistry)
A compound of carbon and a halogen, sometimes with hydrogen.

Halocarbon

Class of man-made chemicals, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), whose heat-trapping properties are among the most damaging of the greenhouse gases. This, coupled with their tendency to remain in the atmosphere for hundreds of years, has resulted in limits on their use. Halocarbons are most commonly used in refrigeration, air conditioning, and electrical systems, as well as blowing agents in some foam insulation products.
References in periodicals archive ?
Any article of upholstered furniture sold for use in residences and containing additive organohalogen flame retardants is a "hazardous substance" and a "banned hazardous substance";
This presents serious public health concerns, the petitioners continue, because all organohalogen flame retardant chemicals--as a class--are toxic due to their physical, chemical and biological properties.
Isomer-specific determination and toxic evaluation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated/brominated dibenzo-pdioxins (PCDDs/PBDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs/PBDFs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and extractable organohalogens (EOX) in carp from the Buffalo River, New York.
Dioxin emission from two oil shale fired power plants in Estonia // Organohalogen.
Preliminary Results on the Immune Status of Inuit Infants," Organohalogen Compounds 13 (1993): 403-6; E.
RoHS legislation calls for suitable technology for the rapid monitoring of organohalogen compounds in matrices such as coal, crude oil, naphtha, and liquefied petroleum gas.
alkali-metal salts and organohalogen compounds, and a 20-MFR PC with a molecular weight of 25,000 were melt blended on a twin-screw extruder using a short residence time of [less than]30 sec and a melt temperature that did not exceed 300 [degrees] C.
may be reacted with a coupling agent such as an organohalogen.
PBDEs belong to the family of organohalogen chemicals that are ubiquitous around the world, persistent in the environment, and of continued concern in health issues.
Exposure and effects assessment of persistent organohalogen contaminants in arctic wildlife and fish.