orgasm


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orgasm

the most intense point during sexual excitement, characterized by extremely pleasurable sensations and in the male accompanied by ejaculation of semen

Orgasm

 

the climax of sexual excitement, experienced toward the end of coitus or of surrogate forms of sexual activity, for example, masturbation and nocturnal emission. The biological role of orgasm, which is an unconditioned reflex, is to reinforce the entire sex act. Orgasm is not required in females for fertilization, and it is not experienced by females of most animal species, with some mammals being the exception. The mechanism of orgasm is complex, involving the physiologically coordinated participation of cortical, subcortical, and cerebrospinal nervous structures.

In healthy men coitus always culminates in orgasm. The majority of healthy, normal women, on the other hand, usually do not experience complete sexual arousal and orgasm until several months to several years after the initiation of a regular sex life. Subsequently, orgasm does not occur in women with every sex act; by convention, it is considered “normal” when sexual intercourse is accompanied by orgasm at least half the time. A large proportion of women—according to some data, up to 41 percent—never experience orgasm; many of them suffer from acquired anorgasmia, which can be corrected, while others may be conditionally characterized as “constitutionally frigid,” although they know all the joys of motherhood and consider their marriages happy.

Attempting to “cure” every case of anorgasmia is as unpromising as attempting to change the temperament of a human being as long as such a “cure” ignores the biological aspects of female sexuality and the differences between individuals.

REFERENCES

Vasil’chenko, G. S. “Orgazm.” In Patogeneticheskie mekhanizmy impotentsii. Moscow, 1956. Pages 47–51.
Imielinski, K. Psikhogigiena polovoi zhizni. Moscow, 1972. (Translated from Polish.)
Sviadoshch, A. M. Zhenskaia seksopatologiia. Moscow, 1974.
Malewska, H. Kulturowe i psychospoleczne determinanty zycia seksualnego. Warsaw, 1967.
Gebhard, P., J. Raboch, and H. Giese. The Sexuality of Women. London, 1970.

G. S. VASIL’CHENKO

orgasm

[′ȯr‚gaz·əm]
(physiology)
The intense, diffuse, and subjectively pleasurable sensation experienced during sexual intercourse or genital manipulation, culminating in the male with seminal ejaculation and in the female with uterine contractions, warm suffusion, and pelvic throbbing sensations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prause revealed, "Surprisingly, people asked to rate the intensity of their orgasms consistently say that their orgasms from self-stimulation feel more intense than their orgasms with a partner.
Meanwhile, 36 percent said they also needed clitoral stimulation to get an orgasm and another 36 percent claimed the stimulation enhanced the intensity of the orgasm and the overall sexual experience.
The sex feels good but my boyfriend is my first partner and I'm beginning to wonder if I'm missing out on better sex, or if orgasms don't really come naturally to me.
STOP TRYING SO HARD: "An ultimate orgasm is giving yourself permission to come really hard, every time
Jagose choses "fake orgasm" as her final site of queer agency, taking the opportunity to discuss the politicization of sex, particularly focused on the impetus toward mutuality and reciprocity as ideals of heterosexual sex which "tempts me [Jagose] to consider fake orgasm as an inventive bodily technique that differently addresses itself to the regulatory apparatus of sexuality" (p.
Afterwards she says her clitoris is too sensitive for me to touch, but I want to give her multiple orgasms.
The short-lived genital orgasm transitions into a blissful, steady whole-body orgasm that pulses all organs and meridians.
I disagree with those who say that a woman's orgasm is the all--important driver of her sexual behavior," says Dr.
Richters and Song (1999) noted that, in their Australian sample, the occurrence of orgasm slightly increased the likelihood that a behaviour was included in their respondents' definitions of having sex.