Orion spur

Orion spur

[ə′rī·ən ′spər]
(astronomy)
That portion of the Orion arm within which the sun is located.
References in periodicals archive ?
In doing so, we'll look outward from our own Orion Spur to the neighboring Perseus Arm of the Milky Way.
Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Long Baseline Array of telescopes in New Mexico, the team gathered data about the radio emissions in eight regions around the Local Arm, which is also called the Orion Spur, to assess where the star-forming regions were.
Our Sun's place in the Milky Way Galaxy is on the inner edge of a spiral-arm fragment called the Orion Spur.
Our solar system is located about two-thirds of the way out from the Milky Way's center, in the Orion Spur, an offshoot of the Perseus spiral arm.
The sun lies in a small partial arm, dubbed the Orion Spur, between the Sagittarius and Perseus arms.
At only a few dozen to a few hundred lightyears away, they're practically right next door in our own Orion Spur.
Our Sun resides in the Milky Way Galaxy, on the inner edge of a spiral-arm fragment called the Orion Spur.
Our Sun dwells in the Milky Way Galaxy near the inner edge of a spiral-arm segment known as the Orion Spur or Local Arm.
The rest of the clusters in this tour share the Orion Spur with our Sun and are strung along it at various distances from us.
Our solar system is currently passing through one of our galaxy's lesser spiral arms, which is called (among many other aliases) the Orion-Cygnus Arm, Local Arm, Orion Arm, or Orion Spur.
And the Orion-Cygnus Arm is often called the Orion Arm, Orion Spur, or Local Arm.
The new data suggest that the Orion Spur, once thought to be merely a hiccup between the Sagittarius and Perseus Arms (see the July issue's foldout), is more likely a full-fledged branch of the Perseus Arm.