Oroonoko


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Oroonoko

the noble savage enslaved; rebels against captors. [Br. Lit.: Oroonoko]
References in periodicals archive ?
Aphra Behn's novel Oroonoko exhibits a respect for the African hero's virtue and for deism that makes this female royalist poet and playwright an early advocate of toleration of diverse ethnic lifestyles.
Equally misguided is her claim that, whereas Behn's novel Oroonoko 'problematizes human commodification', Thomas Southerne's dramatic rendition of Oroonoko 'seeks complex ways to justify it' (p.
Oroonoko, a "postcolonial" novel that has recently interested literary
But it amounts to lively, and certainly never less than thoughtful, interpretation - 'the discourse of slavery' (or under another editorial tag 'the problematic of slavery') as at once overlapping fact and metaphor in trans-Atlantic writings from Aphra Behn's Oroonoko (1688) through to Toni Morrison's Beloved (1987).
Thus she devotes an early chapter to Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, which she reads "as a site of origin (fantasised, no doubt) and .
6) It is little wonder that in 1804 Liverpool merchants, in response to a bill seeking abolition, petitioned Parliament to observe that "under the protection of the Legislature [the petitioners] embarked a considerable part of their property in that Trade, [and] will be very materially injured if the said Bill should pass into a Law," nor is it surprising that none of the several versions and revisions of Thomas Southerne's Oroonoko, increasingly popularized and polemic in the eighteenth century, ever appeared on a Liverpool stage.
Her novel Oroonoko (1688; reprinted 1933), the story of an enslaved African prince whom Behn knew in South America, influenced the development of the English novel.
42) Marshall and Stock cite an anonymous review of Aldridge in Oroonoko from The Times (London), 11 October 1825: "This gentleman is in complexion of the colour of a new half-penny, barring the brightness; his hair is woolly, and his features, although they possess much of the African characte are considerably humanized.
This edition will be of interest to readers in the Caribbean as the short novel Oroonoko is set in the Caribbean during the days of slavery; Behn is regarded as the first professional woman writer in English.
She deals with the works of Quaker writers exposed to the West Indian situation, and then launches into a detailed evaluation of Aphra Behn and her Oroonoko.
Thus Cavendish's Blazing World is positioned as a contribution to the discussions of sovereignty between Hobbes, her husband the Duke of Newcastle, and William Davenant; Behn's Oroonoko is treated as much as presenting a "microcosm of modernity" as an account of colonial politics (88); and Friday, in Robinson Crusoe, "figures not only the racial other but also the political subject more generally" (120).
Caribbeanists have taken a particular interest in Behn's Oroonoko (1688), a "text" that " 'composes' the disparate materials and encounters of the seventeenth-century Atlantic, a project of bricolage that recent critics have begun to consider fundamental to the rise of the novel" (Doyle 2008:99).