Orpah


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Orpah

(ôr`pə), in the Bible, sister-in-law of Ruth.
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Naomi, pleading with Orpah and Ruth to leave her to her solitude and return to their native land to search for new husbands, successfully convinces Orpah to leave.
With the men dearly departed, Orpah returns to her father's house, hoping to marry again.
For example, it has been found that students of social sciences, humanities and arts have more sophisticated beliefs regarding certain knowledge, simple knowledge and omniscient authority as opposed to students of mathematics, engineering and business (Hofer, 2000; Jehng, Johnson & Anderson, 1993; Schommer & Orpah, 2013).
On Naomi's side, why does she tell her daughters-in-law three times to "return" (1:8, 11, 12) and repeat that verb one more time to Ruth, once Orpah leaves them (1:15)?
At the beginning of the Book of Ruth, Naomi suggests that her daughters-in-law, Ruth and Orpah, also go back to their own land and maternal home.
Relationships structure the book, which has chapters devoted to Ruth and Orpah, Ruth and Naomi, Ruth and Boaz, and (Ruth) and Obed.
In a masterstroke of self-casting, the gangling duo assigned themselves the roles of Orpah and Lydia, "two single mothers in search of a lost daughter.
She begs Ruth and Orpah to stay behind, among their own people.
13); the Psalmist reflected by the rivers of Babylon, remembering Zion, and wondered how to sing the Lord's song in a strange land (Psalm 137); Ephrathites from Bethlehem in Judah went to the country of Moab; after the death of her husband and sons there, Naomi returned to Judah with one of her Moabite daughters-in-law, Ruth; the other daughter-in-law, Orpah, went back to her family's home in Moab (Ruth 1).
There they settled and their sons married Moabite women, Orpah and Ruth.
Murray refers to Orpah Crew, a mother of 10 who made up one and a half barrels of flour during one month in the spring when they ran out of potatoes early in the season.
This tells the story of a widow, Naomi, whose two sons die, leaving her with two daughters-in-law, Ruth and Orpah.