Orrmulum

Orrmulum

or

Ormulum

(both: ôrm`yo͞oləm), Middle English collection of homilies on the Gospels, in verse, comprising about 10,000 lines in all. The collection was written c.1200 by Orrm (or Orrmin), an Augustinian canon of Lincolnshire. Because the author had his own system of spelling and because the manuscript is probably in his own handwriting, the Orrmulum is of great importance for the study of Middle English phonology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Breen examines only two examples of works engaged in creating alternatives to Latinate habitus prior to the fourteenth century, and of these only the Orrmulum can properly be described as vernacular.
His reading of the Orrmulum explores its links with preaching and related discourses, and analyses its fascination with correctness and 'right writing'.
He consistently spells the name of the author of the Orrmulum, not Orrm or Orm, but Orme.
Texts of which parts are singled out for detailed study include Beowulf, the Orrmulum, the Peterborough Chronicle, the Brut, the Owl and the Nightingale, and a group of fourteenth-century romances.
The closest parallel to these proportions from vernacular English manuscripts is the even more unusual, and later, holograph Orrmulum, Orm's verse translation and exegesis of the gospels in early Middle English.