Ottomanism


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Ottomanism

 

(Osmanism), a political doctrine of the Ottoman Empire.

Ottomanism, advanced by the Young Turks at the end of the 19th century, orginally proclaimed “the equality of all Ottomans,” that is, of all subjects of the Ottoman Empire irrespective of their nationality and religion. But later, especially after the Young Turks came to power in 1908, it became an implement in their struggle against the national demands of the empire’s non-Turkish peoples; it was the ideological basis of the group’s assertion that these peoples must be assimilated so that a “single Ottoman nation” might be created. The growth of the national liberation movement among the empire’s non-Turkish peoples, as well as the Tripolitan War (the Italo-Turkish War of 1911–12) and the Balkan Wars of 1912–13, demonstrated Ottomanism’s inability to preserve an integral Ottoman Empire. The doctrine yielded to Pan-Islamism, revived by the Young Turks, and to Pan-Turkism.

References in periodicals archive ?
There has been a revival of 'soft' Ottomanism, from the ornamental ewers, encrusted mirrors, and chased Ottoman candlesticks produced by the home-decoration giant Pasabahce, to the introduction of Ottoman specialities such as almond and nutmeg soup on to restaurant menus.
As a reflection of Ottomanism, Turkish was embraced to be a very influential language of literary works.
In Greece thee statements were seen as dangerous and provocative and some even saw them as a reflection of Erdogan's neo- Ottomanism.
Temelkuran shines in describing the ways that Erdogan has exploited and exacerbated the country's polarization, employed a "rhetoric of exaggerated victimhood" that appeals to the crowds' basest instincts, and offered a false "promise that [Turkey's] relationship with the past would finally be mended" by embracing an ersatz Ottomanism of "wooden swords and janissary marches" but no "actual pictures of history.
Sahin places Mustafa within the framework of a more general "Eurasian expansion in bureaucratic action" (5) and Ottoman society (and politics) in the framework of early modern Eurasia, thus minimizing the restrictions imposed by Eurocentrism and Ottomanism that have long caused the Ottoman case to be considered as unique and in isolation from otherwise "global" phenomena.
Summary: Modern day Turkey has made strenuous efforts to improve the image of Ottomanism in the Arab world
If the "Arab Awakening" marked the transition from Ottomanism to Arabism in the early 20th century, the return of political Islam marked post-1967 Arab politics.
To survive this wave of nationalism and protect its borders, in the 19th century the concept of Ottomanism was developed.
Chapter 3 focuses on citizenship, which developed in the Ottoman Empire as a component of "official nationalism" or the imperial ideology of Ottomanism in the late nineteenth century.
Yet as Davutoglu insists, this approach to the region should not be considered a subtle revival of Ottomanism as a hegemonic project, an undertaking sometimes labeled "neo-Ottomanism.
Campos believes scholars need to look beyond the conflict and focus on the phenomenon of what she terms "civic Ottomanism," a "grassroots imperial citizenship project that promoted a unified sociopolitical identity of an Ottoman people struggling over the new rights and obligations of revolutionary political membership" (3).
Turkish Growing Power and Concept of Neo Ottomanism.