Outback Festival

Outback Festival

September in odd-numbered years
In 1895 A. B. "Banjo" Patterson wrote "Waltzing Matilda," the song that is most closely identified with the Australian outback. The song was based on an incident that occurred at Dogworth Station near Winton, Queensland, and it was in Winton that the ballad was first sung in public. Today Winton is host to the biennial Outback Festival, which celebrates Australia's pioneer traditions. There are parades, picnics, historic tours, safaris, rodeos, sheep-shearing and whip-cracking demonstrations, pigeon races, and sports competitions at the festival, which is held in September, at the end of the Australian winter.
The Bronze Swagman Award is presented at the festival for the best "bush verse"—similar to cowboy poetry in the United States. Entries are accepted from all over the world, but the poems must be written in English and must portray an "Australian Bush" theme.
CONTACTS:
Outback Festival Inc.
P.O. Box 24
Winton, QLD 4735 Australia
61-7-4657-1277; fax: 61-7-4657-1558
www.outbackfestival.org
SOURCES:
IntlThFolk-1979, p. 19
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AUSSIES reeling from the Ashes defeat are putting their money on big races planned for the biennial Outback Festival from September 22-26.