Ownerless Property

Ownerless Property

 

in civil law, property that has no owner because of the voluntary refusal of the property by the owner or property whose owner is unknown. Ownerless property also includes unclaimed freight, mail (after the expiration of a special holding period), and unclaimed found objects. Under Soviet law, such property is transferred to state ownership (Civil Code of the RSFSR, art. 143). Ownerless property in a kolkhoz is transferred to the ownership of the kolkhoz according to the procedure established by law. Ownerless property must be distinguished from escheated property, which arises when a deceased person has no heirs.

References in periodicals archive ?
Special attention was also paid to issues related to the overhaul of the Shomikovskaya school, the implementation of a pro-active budgeting program, registration of ownerless property in the ownership of rural settlements, and the participation of the district in the "City Comfortable Environment" program.
Semantics matters here because this shift enables the edict to declare the abandoned slaves as free, rather than simply ownerless property that can be reclaimed again (Major, 1993).
The most common contemporary use of the term regards the designation of ownerless property, its legal status and the processes through which it can be repossessed (Albeck and Elon, 2007; Cohen, 1966).
121) See Bell, supra note 16, at 207 (explaining that, in certain instances of bona vacantia, or ownerless property, the property automatically belongs to the Crown); Strahilevitz, supra note 32, at 395-96 ("The leading American example of an escheat regime is the Uniform Unclaimed Property Act of 1995, which has been enacted in all fifty states and provides a framework by which unclaimed property is transferred to state governments after a specified period of time.
547: "Once it is clear that ownership has been abandoned, at common law the question of title is simple because the Crown acquires ownership under the general principle that ownerless property goes to the Crown (quod nullius est fit domini regis).
First, despite the odd obiter statement to the contrary, (91) it seems tolerably clear that not all ownerless property belongs to the Crown.
The treasury solicitor's department provides legal services to more than 180 central government departments and other publicly-funded bodies inEngland and Wales, and collects ownerless property that belongs to the Crown.
Request for quotations: Providing services related to the merchandising expertise confiscated, movable, ownerless property, facing to the state on the grounds provided for by the laws and regulations of the Russian Federation