Taxus brevifolia

(redirected from Pacific yew)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Pacific yew: western yew, Taxol

Taxus brevifolia

[‚tak·səs ‚brev·i′fō·lē·ə]
(botany)
The Pacific yew tree, from which the anticancer compound taxol is derived.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
And, in another fortunate turn of events, scientists discovered ways to commercially produce paclitaxel--preserving Pacific yew trees (one of the world's slowest growing trees) as well as our Fitness Farm shrubs pictured below.
Taxol was first discovered in the bark and needles of the Pacific yew, an evergreen tree native to old-growth forests of the Pacific Northwest.
The drug was first discovered in the bark of ancient Pacific yew trees that grow in the US state of Oregon.
Western yew -- Taxus brevifolia -- is also called Pacific yew and mountain mahogany.
Bark from the evergreen Pacific yew tree is being used as a major weapon to combat ovarian cancer.
Taxol, an anti-cancer drug, was found in the Pacific yew tree.
Nevertheless, drugs such as Taxol, which comes from the bark of the Pacific yew tree and is highly successful in fighting ovarian cancer, may be the hope of the future in treating various forms of cancer and other health conditions.
These include a profile of the "Eagle Days" festival in Sauk-Prairie, Wisconsin, that draws 25,000 tourists every winter to watch bald eagles roost (and contributes up to a million dollars to the local economy) and the story of Linda Peko, whose ovarian cancer was cured by taxol, an extract from the bark of the endangered Pacific yew tree.
For example, the Pacific yew tree used to be bulldozed and burned.
Spectacular finds, such as the current excitement over the bark extractive taxol from the Pacific yew (Taxus brevifolia) which shows promise in the treatment of ovarian cancer, only illustrate the importance of wood chemistry research.
The problem lies in the fact that the Pacific yew, whose bark is the most available source of taxol, is the habitat of the spotted owl, protected under the Endangered Species Act.
Another example is the breast cancer drug paclitaxel (Taxol(TM)), which was derived from the stripped bark of the Pacific Yew tree," said Professor Quinn.

Full browser ?