Padishah


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Padishah

 

the title of the monarch in several countries of the Middle East. First used in ancient Iran, the term was used for the ruler (sultan) of the Ottoman Empire beginning in the 15th century and was preserved in Turkey until the abolition of the sultanate in 1922. In Afghanistan the title was used from 1926 until the abolition of the monarchy in July 1973.

References in periodicals archive ?
However, the most interesting part of this passage is the third authorial claim ("Bhim Riy, meaning the country that is in the environs of the river Bhinwar and some of that is the part of the country of the padishah 'alam panah, the interpreter of the said work, [it] is bhubhal dis"), which again takes place in the context of a geographical description, and even more specifically, again together with the mention of a river.
bar]d Shah by means of the derogatory epithet 'Imad al-Mulk and the association of the interpreter with 'All's epithet padishah '[a.
The padishah Utara, meaning he who is of the north, his address is ushv[i.
It wasn't a surprise that in Padishah Ahmed's soft reign--when everything outside Anatolia was considered superior and worthy of emulation--Neslihan would be the standard against which other girls would be measured.
Such a scheme would be managed not by the Padishah and his able administrators, but by voluntary organizations of private men, who pooled large amounts of money to eliminate risk for individual merchants.
The Padishah has more spies and infiltrators than ever before--they call themselves travelers, seyyahs, sightseers"--and here Noah indulged in a fit of laughter that wouldn't stop--"creeping around in every saloon and church in the West.
It was general consensus in Alanya that the frivolity introduced by the Padishah was a bad sign that once and for all Europe was going to slaughter the Osmanlis on the battlefield, and that the sensuous decay, while it kept the Janissaries and government officials entertained in Istanbul, was causing a fatal weakening of the martial spirit all over Anatolia.
If there were a firman from the Padishah ordering all able-bodied men to fight a new gaza on his behalf, venturing into the deepest heart of Europe, where the Osmanlis hadn't gone before, he would gladly sign up.
The real danger, Noah would have said, was from European citizens pressing undue advantage from the capitulations granted by the Padishah.
But the buyer who spends most of his time in foreign lands--this ibn Nehmias--well, he's had no shame about cheating the Padishah.