Palakus

Palakus

 

a Scythian king of the second half of the second century B.C. Son of King Scylurus.

Palakus commanded the Scythian troops in the war against Chersonese. He was routed by Diophantos—a military commander of the Pontic king Mithridates VI Eupator—who came to the aid of besieged Chersonese. Palakus soon attacked Chersonese a second time; again defeated, he submitted to Mithridates VI.

References in classic literature ?
Her dream was to make me a Presbyterian minister and I was studying with that end in view.
Likely as not it was Sunday," she laughed; "and I was running away from prayers, from the Presbyterian service, read in a spirit of gloom by my father that chills me yet to think of.
Insufferable in the glare of a Sabbath sun, bleak, windy, and flaring in the gloom of a Sabbath night, and hopelessly depressing on all days of the week, the First Presbyterian Church lifted its blunt steeple from the barrenest area of the flats, and was hideous
I was a good Christian; born and bred in the bosom of the infallible Presbyterian Church.
Presbyterian clergyman (1799-1873), a friend of the Beecher family.
This young girl kept a scrap-book when she was alive, and used to paste obituaries and accidents and cases of patient suffering in it out of the Presbyterian Observer, and write poetry after them out of her own head.
They were Presbyterians, the judge was a freethinker.
Every reader must recollect, that after the fall of the Catholic Church, and the Presbyterian Church Government had been established by law, the rank, and especially the wealth, of the Bishops, Abbots, Priors, and so forth, were no longer vested in ecclesiastics, but in lay impropriators of the church revenues, or, as the Scottish lawyers called them, titulars of the temporalities of the benefice, though having no claim to the spiritual character of their predecessors in office.
Mather Byles, whose Presbyterian scruples had not kept him from the entertainment.
When an itinerant priest of the persuasion of the Methodists, Baptists, Universalists, or of the more numerous sect of the Presbyterians, was accidentally in the neighborhood, he was ordinarily invited to officiate, and was commonly rewarded for his services by a collection in a hat, before the congregation separated.
Monk and Lambert, therefore, had at first thought of creating an army each for himself: Monk in Scotland, where were the Presbyterians and the royalists, that is to say, the malcontents; Lambert in London, where was found, as is always the case, the strongest opposition to the existing power which it had beneath its eyes.
I am sure, from the tenor of books I have read, that many who have visited this land in years gone by, were Presbyterians, and came seeking evidences in support of their particular creed; they found a Presbyterian Palestine, and they had already made up their minds to find no other, though possibly they did not know it, being blinded by their zeal.