Palladianism


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Palladianism

A mode of building following strict Roman forms, particularly popular in England, as set forth in the publications of Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580).

Palladianism

 

a style in 17th- and 18th-century European architecture that developed, within the limits of classicism, the principles established by Palladio. Architects opposed to the affected character and irrationality of the baroque were greatly attracted to the palaces, churches, and villas designed by Palladio, which were characterized by symmetrical planning combined with an extremely varied use of compositional devices and elements from the classical orders. Palladio’s treatise The Four Books of Architecture (1570) was crucial to the spread of his ideas.

V. Scamozzi, who completed some of Palladio’s projects, is considered the first representative of Palladianism. In the 17th century the style was most widespread in the architecture of England (I. Jones) and Holland (J. van Campen). Palladianism enjoyed the height of its popularity in the 18th century, at which time English and German representatives of the style designed buildings, mostly suburban villas, distinguished by elegant yet simple ornament, functional and comfortable layout, and thorough integration with the surroundings (landscape parks). Among the English Palladian architects were Lord Burlington, W. Kent, K. Campbell, J. Paine, and W. Chambers; German representatives included G. W. von Knobelsdorff and F. W. F. von Erdmannsdorf.

Palladianism appeared in Russia in the 1780’s and 1790’s. Most works in the style are distinguished by a certain intimacy and elegant simplicity. Elements of Palladianism characterize the work of C. Cameron, G. Quarenghi, and N. A. L’vov.

REFERENCES

Il’in, M. “Nasledie Palladio i russkaia arkhitektura kontsa XVIII veka.” Arkhitektura SSSR, 1938, no. 10.
Il’in, M. “O palladianstve v tvorchestve D. Kvarengi i N. L’vova.” In the collection Russkoe iskusstvo XVIII veka. Moscow, 1973. Pages 103–08.
Vseobshchaia istoriia arkhitektury vol. 7. Moscow, 1969.
Wittkower, R. Palladio and Palladianism. London, 1974.

Palladianism

Palladianism
A term descriptive of a style of building that follows the strict use of Roman forms, as set forth in the publications of the Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio (1508–1580), particularly under the influence of Lord Burlington in the 18th century.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is commendable that the exhibition tries to show that Palladianism is 'Eternally Contemporary'.
Infinitely flexible, Palladianism was the bridge from the classical language of architecture to its modern dialect--a bridge that stretched beyond 18th-century America into recent times.
77) Robert Tavernor, Palladio and Palladianism (London: Thames & Hudson, 1991), pp.
Steven Parissien, "'The Eclecticism of Roger Morris," in New Light on English Palladianism.
Robert Tavernor is Professor of Architecture and Urban Design at LSE, author of Palladio and Palladianism (Thames & Hudson, 1991), and co-translator (with Richard Schofield) of Andrea Palladio: The Four Books on Architecture (MIT Press, 1997).
The change in taste which was to alter the direction of nineteenth-century British architecture as well as the appearance of many cities -- for good or ill -- was originally linked with Romanticism, the discovery of Nature, the vogue for the picturesque, the cult of ruins, the yearning for mystery and was a revolt against the predictability of Palladianism.
In London, the principles of Classical design promulgated by the 'old masters' were filtered mainly through Palladianism and two dynastic monarchies, the Stuarts and Hanoverians, who oversaw the urban transformation and expansion of medieval London.
The problem, perhaps, is the very nature of Palladianism, for not only did the superior foreign manner become snobbish by association but, in the hands of that prissy, intolerant aesthete the Earl of Burlington, who could understand architecture only by reference to Palladio's books, it became a mere formula for producing grand houses.
The Orders of Architecture and their Application', and 'The Graeco-Roman Roots of Classical Architecture'; the second section also contains three chapters which contain examples from the Renaissance Period, from Baroque, Rococo, and Palladianism, and finally from Neo-classicism and After.
Arguing that Rococo should have been the prevailing decorative style between 1710 and 1770, he and Earnshaw condemn eighteenth-century Palladianism as a cultural disaster imposed on a chauvinistic ruling class.
Jones to him is not an isolated figure introducing a retardataire (and short-lived) Palladianism to Britain while the really exciting architects of Europe were going baroque.
Giles Worsley challenges Summerson's interpretation of Palladianism in British architecture; Caroline van Eck, in a notably original contribution, provides a new and persuasive interpretation of the style that Summerson called [Artisan Mannerism'; and Marlene Elizabeth Heck queries his skimped treatment of American architecture in his Pelican History.