parietal cell

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parietal cell

[pə′rī·əd·əl ‚sel]
(histology)
One of the peripheral, hydrochloric acid-secreting cells in the gastric fundic glands. Also known as acid cell; delomorphous cell; oxyntic cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
18] On the other hand, parietal cells are found just above the chief cells.
To achieve the same effect all PPIs are marketed in delayed-release enteric-coated form so that they do not get activated by acid in the stomach but they dissolve in the intestine from where the drugs take a detour through general circulation and appear at the doorstep of H+/K+ ATPase pumps located on parietal cells of gastric mucosa.
The archesporial cell in the nucellus formed a primary parietal cell by periclinal cell divisions (Fig.
Blood specimens were investigated for complete blood cell count folic acid vitamin B12 intrinsic factor parietal cell antibodies and holotranscoblamine II.
C, Multiphoton microscopy reveals individual gastric oxyntic glands that are separated by a mesh of collagen fibers at the deeper part of the mucosal layer ([greater than or equal to] 60 m depth) D, The corresponding light-microscopic image shows there are chief cells and parietal cells in each gastric gland (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnifications x400 [B and D]).
As the disease progresses there is a reduction in parietal cells, actually reducing acid secretion.
Your stomach has cells on its lining called parietal cells, which secrete a protein called intrinsic factor and hydrochloric acid.
This patient had been previously diagnosed with gastric atrophy, which would indicate that the parietal cells in the stomach had been damaged or destroyed, thus limiting the production of IF.
The stomach of the pangolin and rat are characterized with numerous gastric pits with the zymogenic cells located towards the base of the gland, the parietal cells along the length and the mucus-secreting cell at the luminal surface (Fig 1a & b).
After absorption, these enter the gastric parietal cells from the plasma where in the acidic milieu these are arranged non enzymatically to form active sulphenamide derivatives which then bind covalently to sulphhydryl groups of [H.
These receptors occur in brain, gastric parietal cells, heart, smooth muscle and glands.
autoantibodies cause destruction of the parietal cells.