Parsons

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Parsons,

city (1990 pop. 11,924), Labette co., SE Kans.; inc. 1871. It is a shipping point for dairy products, grain, and livestock. Manufactures include ammunition, wire and paper products, plastics, and appliances.

Parsons

1. Sir Charles Algernon. 1854--1931, English engineer, who developed the steam turbine
2. Gram, real name Cecil Connor. 1946--73. US country-rock singer and songwriter; founder of the Flying Burrito Brothers (1968--70), he later released the solo albums G.P. (1973) and Grievous Angel (1974)
3. Talcott. 1902--79, US sociologist, author of The Structure of Social Action (1937) and The Social System (1951)
References in periodicals archive ?
While analysis of rhetorically regulative values has a place within the analytic topoi that fall under the heading of cultural rhetorics, we need to supplement Aune's vintage Parsonian view with other, thicker understandings of culture.
Some of the theoretical language he uses is a mix of Parsonian functionalism and conflict theory.
The problem with Parsonian functionalism was that it assumed the system as a whole is not structurally flawed, and only by fixing its dysfunctional parts, it can be restored to equilibrium.
It provided graphic representation of the Parsonian nuclear family that featured prominently in midcentury portraits of "the free world.
overlap, interact, and (to use a rather unfortunate Parsonian metaphor) "inter-penetrate.
Mouzels (1995) argued that Parsonian theory, while providing a conceptual framework for the study of cultural, social, and personality systems, overemphasized "systemness" or determinacy at the expense of agency on both the macro and micro levels of analysis.
Beckert argues that he should not have been dismissed as irrelevant to the new economic sociology of 'embeddedness', while Hessling and Pahl apply the Parsonian categories to the global system of finance.
Although not an uncontested view,3 its ascendancy meant that pre-1970s social theory was dominated by Parsonian structural functionalism: a perspective, informed by biological discourse, of society as a (social) system, with a bias towards nomothetic and natural scientific methodologies.
If Victor Turner came out of the English functionalist tradition and Clifford Geertz arose from the thoroughly American (Talcot) Parsonian school, Marshall Sahlins has been the most advanced and persistent voice of the French structuralist tradition pioneered by Claude Levi-Strauss.
Particularly in the historical context of the Parsonian notions of gender that dominated in the 1950s and 60s, which claimed that different social roles for males and females were both rooted in biology and important for the maintenance of societal equilibrium, the feminist sex/gender distinction and the attendant shift away from biology were vital interventions.
This is in direct contrast to the Parsonian approach that emphasized the social role rather than the individual, as the basic unit of analysis, and used dimensions such as social space, cultural space, psychological space etc.
Like government, researchers appear to share the belief in an objective view of the world with entrepreneurs portrayed as having a function within a Parsonian economic machine (see discussion in Lipset, 2000).