Passion of Christ


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Passion of Christ

See also Christ.
agony in the garden
Christ confronts His imminent death. [N.T.: Matthew 26:36–45; Mark 14:32–41]
cock
its crowing reminded Peter of his betrayal. [N.T.: John 18:27]
Cross,
the upon which Christ was crucified. [N.T.: Matthew 27:31–50]
crown of
thorns placed upon Christ’s head after scourging. [N.T.: John 19:2]
Deposition
Christ is taken from the cross and enshrouded. [N.T.: Matthew 27:57–60; Christian Art: Appleton, 55]
dice
cast by Roman guards for Christ’s robe. [N.T.: Matthew 27:35]
Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani?
“My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” Jesus’s cry at the ninth hour. [N.T.: Mark 15:34]
Entry into Jerusalem
first scene of Passion cycle in painting. [Art: Hall, 114]
gall
sponge soaked with it given to crucified Jesus. [N.T.: Matthew 26:48]
Gethsemane
scene of Christ’s agony over impending death. [N.T.: Matthew 26:36–45; Mark 14:32–41]
Golgotha
(Calvary) site of Christ’s crucifixion. [N.T.: Matthew 27:32]
hammer
Christian symbol for martyrdom, crucifixion. [Christian Symbolism: Jobes, 391, 716]
kiss
means by which Judas identified Jesus. [N.T.: Matthew 26:48–50]
ladder
stood upon by Joseph to remove nails holding Christ to the cross. [Christian Symbolism: Appleton, 55]
lantern
held by Judas, leading officers to Christ. [N.T.: John 18:3]
Passion Play
dramatic presentation of Christ’s Passion, notably the production at Oberammergau. [Medieval Drama: Benét, 763]
Peter’s denial
Peter denies Christ three times. [N.T.: Matthew 26: 67–75]
pillar and cord
depicted Christ’s scourging. [Christian Symbolism: Appleton, 76]
scourges
instruments of Christ’s flagellation. [Christian Symbolism: N.T.: Matthew 27:26]
seamless robe
Christ’s garment, wagered for by Roman soldiers. [N.T.: John 19:23–24]
Simon the Cyrenean
bystander compelled to carry Christ’s cross. [N.T.: Matthew 27:32]
spear
weapon plunged into Jesus’s side during crucifixion. [N.T.: John 19:34]
Stations of the Cross
depictions of episodes of Christ’s death. [Christianity: Brewer Dictionary, 1035]
stigmata
wounds of Christ appearing on others. [Christian Hagiog.: Attwater, 136, 146, 211]
30 pieces of silver
price Judas was paid for identifying Christ. [N.T.: Matthew 26:15]
three nails
used to crucify Jesus. [Christian Symbolism: Appleton, 67]
vernicle
Veronica’s veil with Jesus’s facial image. [Christian Symbolism: Appleton, 107]
Via Dolorosa
Christ’s route to Calvary. [Christianity: Brewer Dictionary, 112]
vinegar
given to Jesus to drink. [N.T.: Matthew 26:34, 48]
whipping post
scene of Christ’s scourging. [N.T.: Matthew 15:15]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Passion of Christ is an adaptation of Handel's 1716 Brockes Passion.
The program involves five resistance exercises performed while reciting the decades of the rosary and meditating on the Passion of Christ.
In the session on <<Beauty and Drama: Image, Theology and Liturgy>>, Dr Rosa Bacile spoke on <<Medieval Liturgical Drama: The Burial Arrangements of King William II and the Passion of Christ mosaics, Monreale Cathedral>>, Professor Elizabeth Parker offered a paper on <<Christ on the Cross in Antelami's Parma Deposition>> and Dr Maigorzata Krasnodcbska-D'Aughton and Dr Edel Bhreathnach spoke together on the topic of <<Piety, pictures and the Passion of Christ: the iconographic programme of Ennis friary>>.
The piece seeks to understand why the many films on the Passion of Christ are generally considered poor and fail to capture the real Christ and his importance on screen.
The citizens of this small German town were miraculously spared from the Black Deathin the Seventeenth century, and they famously vowed to perform the Passion of Christ every decade in thanks to God.
THE TRIUMPH OF THE CROSS: THE PASSION OF CHRIST IN THEOLOGY AND THE ARTS, FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO THE COUNTER-REFORMATION.
In 1633, the citizens of Oberammergau were spared from the Plague and in thanks for this divine intervention they vowed to perform the Passion of Christ every 10 years, which today, with 2,000 participants, presents a truly amazing spectacle.
In our surrendering and in our sharing, we gain renewed awareness that the passion of Christ continues.
Living through the passion of Christ each year can take us on a journey to the deep truths of human existence and encourage us to live hopefully.
In the opening essay Freeman discusses the Christocentric conception of English martyrdom in which verification of a martyr's sanctity was measured by his or her mimetic conformity to the passion of Christ.
Born Francesco Forgione on May 25th, 1887 in the tiny, poor village of Pietrelcina on the "spur of the boot" in Italy, Saint Padre Pio, who had been given that name upon ordination as a Franciscan Capuchin Father, became the first priest to bear the Stigmata (wounds of the Passion of Christ impressed on his flesh), which he carried amid great pain until his death in 1967.
The Beauty of the Cross: The Passion of Christ in Theology and the Arts, from the Catacombs to the Eve of the Renaissance.