patrician

(redirected from Patricii)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Patricii: plebs

patrician

(pətrĭsh`ən), member of the privileged class of ancient Rome. Two distinct classes appear to have come into being at the beginning of the republic. Only the patricians held public office, whether civil or religious. From the 4th cent. B.C. the plebeians struggled constantly for political equality until, by the 3d cent. B.C., the only offices reserved to the patricians were the civil office of interrex and some priestly offices. The increasing number of plebs in office together with patricians gave rise to the nobiles, an aristocracy of ruling families of both classes. Caesar and Augustus promoted plebeians to the patrician class. External marks of a patrician were a distinctive tunic and a shoe adorned with an ivory crescent.

patrician

1. a member of the hereditary aristocracy of ancient Rome. In the early republic the patricians held almost all the higher offices
2. a high nonhereditary title awarded by Constantine and his eastern Roman successors for services to the empire
3. in medieval Europe
a. a title borne by numerous princes including several emperors from the 8th to the 12th centuries
b. a member of the upper class in numerous Italian republics and German free cities
4. (esp in ancient Rome) of, relating to, or composed of patricians
References in periodicals archive ?
Two versions of Owayne Miles and The Vision of William of Stranton together with the long text of the Tractatus de Purgatorio Sancti Patricii, ed.
Entonces presenta brevemente la vida de San Patricio, patron de Irlanda y estudia su representacion literaria en El purgatorio de San Patricio (1627) de Calderon, la Vida y purgatorio de San Patricio (1628) de Perez de Montalban, la traduccion del Tractatus de Purgatorio Sancti Patricii por Maria de Francia (1179) y algunos pasajes del Quijote; la autora afirma que las dos primeras ensenan "una posibilidad para el triunfo en el mas alla: la fortaleza en la voluntad conseguida por el nombre de Cristo" (p.
Patrick, commonly known as the Libri Sancti Patricii, and provides introductions and notes to each manuscript.
3 M: Pauli Veneti legerit collato simul 27 capite libri Lud: Rom: Patricii.
After the union of the patricii and the plebes in a sole estate, the Romans divided all persons into cives (members of the civitas) and peregrini: "Civis, according to Ulpian, is he who possesses the complete rights of a Roman citizen.
Chapter 7 fixes the Espurgatoire Seint Patriz in the surprisingly broad constellation of Latin and vernacular texts with which it shares either roots or thematic characteristics, and also probes several instances where Marie's translation stealthily slips away from its chief model, the only slightly older Tractatus Sancti Patricii of the Cistercian monk Henry of Saltrey.