Pazzi conspiracy


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Pazzi conspiracy

(pät`tsē), 1478, plot against Lorenzo de' MediciMedici, Lorenzo de'
, 1449–92, Italian merchant prince, called Lorenzo il Magnifico [the magnificent]. He succeeded (1469) his father, Piero de' Medici, as head of the Medici family and as virtual ruler of Florence.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (Lorenzo il Magnifico) and his brother Giuliano, designed to end the hegemony of the Medici in the Florentine state and to enlarge papal territory. It was instigated by Pope Sixtus IVSixtus IV
, 1414–84, pope (1471–84), an Italian named Francesco della Rovere (b. near Savona); successor of Paul II. He was made general of his order, the Franciscans, in 1464 and became (1467) a cardinal.
..... Click the link for more information.
, his nephew Gerolamo Riario, Archbishop Salviati, and members of the Pazzi family, a wealthy Florentine family that rivaled the Medici. Actually, the Pazzi were tools in the conspiracy, which aimed not only at the death of the Medici, but at the elevation of Riario to power in Florence. Details of the plot were worked out by Salviati and the Pazzi while Riario and the pope remained in Rome. On Apr. 26, during High Mass at the cathedral, Giuliano de' Medici was stabbed to death, while Lorenzo escaped with a wound. The enraged Florentines seized and killed the conspirators. The Medici remained firmly entrenched in power.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, the most famous work is probably Angelo Poliziano's Coniurationis commentarium, the first account of the Pazzi conspiracy against the Medici brothers, written in 1478, immediately after the attack:5 an elegant literary narration that can be considered the cornerstone of the Medici propaganda after the plot.
He also fought for Florence--although later he was part of the Pazzi conspiracy against the Medicis (3).
Tom Riley again plays the great man, with Florence in chaos in the wake of the Pazzi conspiracy.
Many Medici wives in Lucrezia's family were used as mediators and at times were forced to tacitly watch as their paternal houses were at war with their husbands and sons; Lucrezia Tornabuoni's daughter-in-law, Clarice Orsini, had her paternal household often at odds with the Medici, and her own daughter, Maria Bianca, was married to Guglielmo de' Pazzi, clearly a precarious marriage alliance given the Pazzi conspiracy which ended by taking the life of Giuliano.
I feel myself come into some strange labyrinth," he confesses to Lanfredini not long after the Pazzi conspiracy (113).
The novel provides a vivid picture of Italian life during this time, with the extreme and brutal violence of the Pazzi Conspiracy.
For most historians, the significance of the Pazzi conspiracy lies in its violent aftermath.
In fact, after the Pazzi Conspiracy of 1478, in which Lorenzo was wounded and his brother murdered, mild Clarice underwent a change of character, suddenly becoming wilful and fractious.
In Chapter 4, Davie sets the continuation of Morgante and Ciriffo Calvaneo against the background of the Pazzi conspiracy of April 1478.
In 1478, for instance, when Lorenzo de'Medici went to war with the papacy in the aftermath of the Pazzi conspiracy, he wrote his cofathers, the King of France and the Duke of Milan, seeking aid.
Yet the first bastions appeared in Italy a decade before as a result of the groundbreaking performance of siege artillery during the so-called War of the Pazzi Conspiracy (1478-80).
Most of the poetry was written after Piero's death in 1469, at a very delicate juncture of Florence's history when Lorenzo, just twenty years old, rose to power, and only a few years before the tragic Pazzi Conspiracy (1478) in which Lorenzo's younger brother, Giuliano, was assassinated.