scallop

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Related to Pectinidae: Ostreidae

scallop

or

pecten,

marine bivalvebivalve,
aquatic mollusk of the class Pelecypoda ("hatchet-foot") or Bivalvia, with a laterally compressed body and a shell consisting of two valves, or movable pieces, hinged by an elastic ligament.
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 mollusk. Like its close relative the oyster, the scallop has no siphons, the mantle being completely open, but it differs from other mollusks in that both mantle edges have a row of steely blue "eyes" (which use a mirror consisting of a mosaic of crystals to focus light) and tactile projections. The rounded shells have radiating ribs with flared "ears" or "wings" at the hinge. Scallops are capable of swimming or leaping about by snapping their shells, which are controlled by a powerful adductor muscle, the only part of the animal that is eaten. Scallops are more common on the Atlantic coast than the Pacific. The common scallop is about 2 in. (5 cm) long. Found abundantly in shallow and offshore waters and in eelgrass and mud flats from Cape Cod to Texas, it is taken in large numbers around Long Island. The giant scallop, found in deeper waters from Labrador to New Jersey, attains a length of 5 in. (12.7 cm). Scallops are classified in the phylum MolluscaMollusca
, taxonomic name for the one of the largest phyla of invertebrate animals (Arthropoda is the largest) comprising more than 50,000 living mollusk species and about 35,000 fossil species dating back to the Cambrian period.
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, class Pelecypoda or Bivalvia, order Filibranchia, family Pectinidae.

Scallop

One of a continuous series of curves resembling segments of a circle, used as a decorative element on the outer edge of a strip of wood used as a molding.

scallop

[′skäl·əp]
(geology)
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of various bivalve mollusks in the family Pectinidae distinguished by radially ribbed valves with undulated margins.

scallop

scallops: a scalloped molding
One of a continuous series of curves resembling segments of a circle, used as a decorative element on the outer edge of a strip of wood, molding etc.

scallop

1. any of various marine bivalves of the family Pectinidae, having a fluted fan-shaped shell: includes free-swimming species (genus Pecten) and species attached to a substratum (genus Chlamys)
2. the edible adductor muscle of certain of these molluscs
3. either of the shell valves of any of these molluscs
4. the shape of a scallop shell used as the badge of a pilgrim, esp in the Middle Ages

SCALLOP

(language, history)
A medium-level language for CDC computers, used to bootstrap the first Pascal compiler.
References in periodicals archive ?
2003): Les Pectinidae miocenes des faluns (Ouest de la France).
2006): New phylogenies of the Pectinidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia): Reconciling morphological and molecular approaches.
2007) stated that the crystallographic arrangement of representatives of five families of bivalves (Ostreidae, Pectinidae, Propeamussiidae, Anomiidae, and Placunidae) is identical, with the main surfaces of the folia being coincident with the {108} rhombohedral faces and the c-axis inclined opposite to the growth direction.
The age or size at sexual maturity in Pectinidae varies between species from 71 days or 20 mm for Argopecten gibbus (Miller et al.
Clearly, significant changes in chromosome number and structure occurred during the evolution of Pectinidae.
In the family Pectinidae, the intestine loops within the otherwise anatomically distinct gonad, and indeed Le Pennec et al.
Haitensis (SOWERBY) X X X Familia Pectinidae Genero Argopecten MONTEROSATO Argopecten aff.
For the free-living, short-lived Pectinidae Argopecten purpuratus, the daily growth rhythm is linked to the solar period whereas growth amplitude seems to be related to the occurrence of spawning events, probably triggered by specific water temperature patterns, tidal regime and SST seem to be the major environmental parameters that govern shell growth rhythms and/or increment thickness for two nearshore species--the Mytilidae Choromytilus chorus and the Veneridae Eurhomalea tufa--which grow more slowly and have a life span longer than A.
Some bivalve families, notably the Pectinidae, have representatives that form external ridges, or striae, externally on their shell surface.