pectoralis minor

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Related to Pectoralis minor muscle: Pectoralis major muscle, Subclavius muscle

pectoralis minor

[‚pek·tə′ral·əs ′mīn·ər]
(anatomy)
The small, deep muscle connecting the third to fifth ribs with the scapula.
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However, there was marked tenderness over both the left pectoralis minor muscle belly and tendinous attachment at the coracoid process.
hyperabduction maneuver, in which the patient's pectoralis minor muscle was tested for involvement by bringing the seated patient's involved arm into abduction and extension) resulted in both a decrease in radial pulse and a reproduction of the patient's symptoms in a similar distribution that occurred on digital pressure of the pectoralis minor muscle.
The common subscapular trunk descends medial to the axillary vein and medial root of the median nerve, resting on ventral surface of subscapular muscle under cover of pectoralis minor muscle.
The lateral thoracic artery arose from the common subscapular trunk, deep to the pectoralis minor muscle and passes medially to divide into two branches supplying thoracic wall at the level of 4th and 5th intercostal space.
The tendon passes superficial to pectoralis minor muscle and gets inserted into the superior surface of coracoid process.
It was observed that in the right upper limb, the lateral thoracic artery, thoraco-dorsal, circumflex scapular and posterior circumflex scapular artery arises from a common trunk from the second part of axillary artery underneath the pectoralis minor muscle (picture 1).
In this case, the right axillary artery bifurcated into axillary artery I and axillary artery II posterior to the pectoralis minor muscle.
The present study assessed the respiratory muscles for maximal effort due to the major limitation of spirometry in its poor sensitivity to detect moderate inspiratory muscle weakness14, the strength of the accessory respiratory muscles, and specifically the latissimusdorsi, pectoralis major (sternocostal and clavicular portions), pectoralis minor and abdominals, were manually tested using an aneroid sphygmomanometer (Alpk2 Sphygmomanometer, Japan) for the lattisimus dorsi, pectoralis major (clavicular portion), pectoralis major (sternocostal portion), pectoralis minor muscles, held by the evaluator at the test position and the difference achieved by the patients from a baseline setting of 20 millimetres mercury (mmHg) and the seven stage sit-up test for abdominal muscles.
Subjects performed an additional push at the end of the range to maximally contract the lower trapezius and pectoralis minor muscles.