Pelike


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Pelike

 

an ancient Greek vessel, a variant of the amphora. A pelike differs from an amphora in that its lower portion is more rounded, giving the vessel a more stable but heavier appearance. Its use was the same as that of the amphora (seeAMPHORA).

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Both women's garments billow out unusually toward the hem on the bottom-heavy pelike in Newcastle that they adorn (Fig.
A favorite hat of the Pan Painter is the furry hat of the fisherman or ferryman; not surprisingly, this hat mimics the shape of the pelike.
Finally, the overall composition could fill the shape of the pot most appropriately, as on the Busiris pelike in Athens (69) and the Pan Painter's name vase.
Nolan) 114 16 -- Panathenaic amphora 33 1 1 Other amphoras 4 -- 1 Askos -- 1 -- Chous 2 -- 2 Cup 4 9 1 Stemless cup -- 1 -- Dinos 2 -- -- Hydria 29 11 -- Kantharos -- 1 -- Bell krater with lugs 5 3 -- Calyx krater 20 2 1 Column krater 4 29 80 Volute krater 6 -- -- Other kraters 1 1 -- Lebes gamikos -- 4 -- Lekanis 1 -- -- Lekythos 51 30 -- Loutrophoros 1 4 -- Mug -- 1 1 Oinochoe 7 3 1 Pelike 9 22 21 Phiale 2 -- -- Plate 2 1 -- Psykter -- 1 3 Skyphos 1 8 -- Stamnos 22 3 -- Other fragments 28 15 3 Total 354 170 116 * Drawn from the Beazley
For an obol, or roughly the price of a red-figure pelike by the hand of Beazley's `Achilles Painter', the craftsman could buy nearly four litres of grain.
In recent decades, scholars have offered rich treatments of this pelike, citing it in discussions of the interface between oral and literate cultures, and in treatments of the nuanced relations between words and images on painted pottery.
The analysis of the pelike that I offer here develops the suggestions that mimesis, sign making, poikilia, and ambiguity are very much the painter's concerns--and this in ways that Lissarrague's and Neer's rich discussions have left still to be explored--while also accommodating these within the pederastic frame common to my and Immerwahr's analyses.
Third, the artist assigns himself a variegated role in the scene and uses both the inscriptions and the ornamentation on the pelike to comment on his status and position vis-a-vis his elite audience.
Both amphora and pelike belong among what Anthony Snodgrass classes as "generally banausic" vessels, those found in non-sympotic settings, but he goes on to note the more floating status of these two vase types: "Especially in the case of the finer specimens with inscribed figure-scenes, it is hard to believe that they would not be shown off to the drinkers of the wine" (Snodgrass 2000, 28).
Juliusz Ziomecki's (1975, 85) brief discussion of the pelike offers a starting point for my initial review of scenes in which individuals apprehend a bird or birds, and grant the apparition the status of a meaning-bearing sign.
This maps very closely onto the sequence on the pelike.
In his study of Heraclean iconography, Vollkommer (1988, 32) considers an Attic red-figured pelike of about 430 B.