Peltier coefficient

Peltier coefficient

[pel′tyā ‚kō·i‚fish·ənt]
(physics)
The ratio of the rate at which heat is evolved or absorbed at a junction of two metals in the Peltier effect to the current passing through the junction.
References in periodicals archive ?
where q is the heat flux density vector, J is the electric current density vector, E is the electric field intensity vector, [[PI]] is the Peltier coefficient matrix, [k] is the thermal conductivity matrix, [[sigma]] is the electrical conductivity matrix, [[alpha]] is the Seebeck coefficient matrix [5].
The Peltier coefficient is a measure of the amount of heat carried by electrons or holes.
When two different materials are joined together to form a loop, as shown in Figure 2, there will be an abrupt change in heat flow at the junctions because the two materials have different Peltier coefficients.