Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts


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Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts,

Philadelphia, established in 1805, incorporated in 1806. It is supported by private endowment. The academy grew out of a proposal by Charles Willson PealePeale, Charles Willson
, 1741–1827, American portrait painter, naturalist, and inventor, b. Queen Annes County, Md. Early Life

Apprenticed to a saddler in Annapolis, he became at 20 his own master and taught himself various other trades—watchmaking,
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 for an art institution; this led to the founding of the Columbianum, which in 1795 mounted the first art exhibition in the United States. The academy was formed to supersede it, sponsored by 71 Philadelphia citizens, among them Peale, Charles Biddle, William RushRush, William,
1756–1833, American sculptor, one of the earliest in the country, b. Philadelphia. His wood carvings, clay models, and figureheads were famous in their day.
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, and George ClymerClymer, George
, 1739–1813, American political leader, signer of the Declaration of Independence, b. Philadelphia. A prosperous merchant, he ardently supported the colonial cause before the American Revolution and served (1775–76) as one of the Continental treasurers.
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. The present building, designed by Frank Furness and George W. Hewitt, was constructed in 1876 to house the academy's art collection, which includes the Temple Collection of modern American paintings, the Gibson Collection of 19th-century European paintings, and the John Frederick Lewis Collection of early American paintings. The academy's more than 2,000 works by American artists forms one of the richest collections of such art in the field. In 1999 the academy acquired a 1916 commercial structure located across a narrow street from its main building. Reconfigured, renamed the Samuel M.V. Hamilton Building, and opened in 2006, it incorporates galleries for modern and contemporary American art and also houses the academy's art school, the oldest in the United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
The training that Eakins had received in Paris became the model for the program he instituted at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts during his tenure from 1879 to 1886.
Some 500 objects now housed at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts constitute an extraordinary collection of art by women assembled by Philadelphia-based artist and collector Linda Lee Alter, beginning in the 1980s.
The Association of Scholars of Christianity in the History of Art (ASCHA) are holding two symposia: on 21 February, Christianity and Latin American Art: Apprehension, Appropriation, Assimilation at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles, California; and on 23 and 24 March Faith, Identity, and History: Representations of Christianity in Modern and Contemporary African American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, PA.
After his stint in the American West, Diederich returned to the East Coast and studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where he befriended Paul Manship (1885-1966).
Museums participating in the program in 2008 include the International Center of Photography, New York; the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia; the St.
In such a wide-ranging account, there are the inevitable errors: Eakins taught at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, not the Philadelphia Academy; the completion of Cologne Cathedral began in 1840, not 1823, when the existing choir was restored.
As a teacher at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Eakins initially went along with the school's policy of segregated life drawing classes, whereby men could model nude only for male art students, women for female students.
After applying a number of times to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, he was finally accepted.
The most recent of these public sculptures is the fifty-one foot high Paint Torch, marking the grounds of the newly opened Lenfest Plaza at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA).
Tom Armstrong (1932-2011) was involved in the leadership of four museums: the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum in Williamsburg, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh.
Brellochs previously presented solo shows at the CCC's Blackwood Campus gallery, Clay College in Millville, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia and Opus One in Munich, Germany.

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