Pequod


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Pequod

ship in which Captain Ahab pursued the great white whale. [Am. Lit.: Melville Moby Dick]
See: Quest
References in periodicals archive ?
Written during a time when 19th century America was demanding more and more of indigenous peoples' land, Sedgwick's portrayal of the Pequod Wars as a massacre led by Puritans, was a "direct challenge to the morality of [her] nation" (Kelley, 1995).
This chapter, which follows the Pequod crew's frantic acquiescence to Ahab's quest for vengeance on the whale, is written as if it were a scene from a play and emphasizes the geographical diversity of the sailors, all of whom are singing in chorus.
The folkloric frame story of the book of Job is also present as a backdrop to chapter 73, which describes Stubb and Flask's conversation about the presence of the diabolical Fedallah on board the Pequod, and his resemblance to the Satan of Job.
This dice pit was our Pequod, we were both Captain Ahah, and that 32-to-1 bet was our white whale.
At last we rose and dressed; and Queequeg, taking a prodigiously hearty breakfast of chowders of all sorts, so that the landlady should not make much profit by reason of his Ramadan, we sallied out to board the Pequod, sauntering along, and picking our teeth with halibut bones.
Of all the crew on the Pequod it is Starbuck who most wishes to disobey his captain.
Imagine if Charles Dickens had signed on for a voyage with the Pequod, and you get some idea of what Amitav Ghosh's sprawling new historical novel, Sea of Poppies, has in store.
I was on the Christopher, not the Pequod, and when we left the dock near the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, it was a sunny day.
In the novel Moby-Dick, in which American port is the ship the Pequod based?
23 Ebenezer Scrooge, reading Moby Dick, disses the captain of the Pequod Xxx, Xxxx
Among the texts discussed are Daniel Horsmanden's Journal of the Proceedings of the Detection of the Conspiracy (a 1744 account of the New York Conspiracy Trials); Charles Brockden Brown's novel of the 1793 yellow fever epidemic, Arthur Mervyn; James Fenimore Cooper's The Pioneers and Notions of the Americans; Pequod writer William Apess's autobiography A Son of the Forest; and abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison's tract, Thought on African Colonization.
Likewise, our conception of Ahab's relationship to the crew of the Pequod, that vessel named for an extinct tribe (not only foreshadowing the ship's destruction, but suggesting its present repression under Ahab and all repression of native by European cultures), assumes a repression of heteroglossia in the context of the natural vitality of the socially and racially mixed crew, the collection of Anglo-Saxon officers, a savage class of Negro, Indian, and Polynesian harpooners, and the working-class crew of roughs (plus the unclassifiable Ishmael himself).