prevalence

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prevalence

[′prev·ə·ləns]
(genetics)
The frequency with which a medical condition is found in specific population at a specific time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 2 presents the unadjusted period prevalence of health-related measures among native-born Blacks and Whites.
Crude HIV period prevalence was calculated from ward records as total HIV-infected admissions/total admissions.
We found in this study that using weekly period prevalence data rather than point prevalence data only requires a slightly larger sample-size but the resulting regression coefficients are less intuitive as they describe the loss in weight gain per week in which infection occurred at any time.
Depending on the population, the period prevalence estimates, M1, ranged from 1% to approximately 48%.
16] We report the seven-day period prevalence, burden and correlates of pain, and other physical and psychological symptoms, among HIV patients receiving ART in three public sector HIV clinics in South Africa (SA).
2) ZIP code ** Western -- -- Urban -- -- Rural -- -- Eastern -- -- Urban -- -- Rural -- -- * Annualized 2-year disease period prevalence, Oregon, 2005 and 2006.
Period prevalence refers to the presence of pain (of a specified severity and duration) at least once during a specific time period, e.
AIDS cases are calculated on a specified day each month and are averaged for the interval Period prevalence is reported per 10,000 inmates and is calculated as ([the number of AIDS cases during the interval divided by the prison population] multiplied by 10,000).
The few minor quibbles I had with this otherwise marvelous text include a definition of prevalence that seems to confuse the concepts of point and period prevalence, the rather limited discussion about nonprobability sampling (see evaluation researcher Michael Quinn Patton, who has elsewhere described various nonprobability sampling strategies), and the unfortunate omission from the bibliography of the excellent McMaster series on reading clinical journals that appeared in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.