Personal Name Asteroids

Personal Name Asteroids

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

An asteroid is one of thousands of small planets, 95 percent of whose orbits lie between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Initially these were given mythological names, but as telescopes increased in strength and more asteroids were discovered, astronomers began naming them after places and people. The various astrologers who have studied the influence of asteroids have reached a consensus, which is, as noted in J. Lee Lehman’s The Ultimate Asteroid Book, that “asteroids have astrological effects which may be studied,” and the “name of an asteroid has astrological significance.”

The essential clue with which one begins this type of research is the name of the asteroid, which gives preliminary insight into the asteroid’s astrological “temperament.” The early asteroids studied by astrologers were named after mythological figures, and an exploration of the relevant myths provided a preliminary clue to the nature of these tiny planets’ influence. When researchers began shifting from explicitly mythological asteroids and started examining asteroids with common names like Barry and Patricia, they continued to follow their previous line of exploration by finding initial clues in certain specialized reference works that provided etymologies for common names. Patricia, for example, is derived from the Latin patricius, meaning “noble one,” which provides “nobility” as an initial clue to the influence of the asteroid.

Astrologers also found that individuals have a special relationship with the asteroid bearing their name. Thus, the natal location of the appropriate personal name asteroid will show something about the character of the individual, and the transits of the same asteroid will give indications about current influences.

Sources:

Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford Press, 1988.
Press, Nona Gwynn. Personal Name Asteroids. San Diego: Astro Computing Services, 1987.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.
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