Phaedrus


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Phaedrus

(fē`drəs), fl. 1st cent. A.D., Latin writer, a Thracian slave, possibly a freedman of Augustus. He wrote fables in verse based largely on those of AesopAesop
, legendary Greek fabulist. According to Herodotus, he was a slave who lived in Samos in the 6th cent. B.C. and eventually was freed by his master. Other accounts associate him with many wild adventures and connect him with such rulers as Solon and Croesus.
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. The prose collections of fables that were popular throughout Western Europe in the Middle Ages were probably derived from Phaedrus.

Phaedrus

 

Born circa 15 B.C. in Macedonia; died circa A.D. 70 in Rome. Latin fabulist.

Phaedrus was a slave and later a freedman of the emperor Augustus. Of his five books of Aesopian Fables in iambic verse, 134 fables have been preserved. In the later books, Phaedrus expanded the range of the traditional genre by introducing moral judgments, anecdotes, and other new material. Phaedrus was plebeian in outlook, and he devoted much attention to social motifs. His style is rather dry and the narrative is invariably subordinate to the moral.

REFERENCES

Fedri Babrii: Basni. Translated by M. L. Gasparov. Moscow, 1962.
Gasparov, M. L. Antichnaia literaturnaia basnia (Fedr i Babrii). Moscow, 1971.

Phaedrus

?15 bc--?50 ad, Roman author of five books of Latin verse fables, based chiefly on Aesop
References in periodicals archive ?
17) See Ferrari's account of Phaedrus as impresario, especially 1-34.
Should we then reject it, Phaedrus, The wisdom poets crave, Seeking only form and pure detachment, Simplicity and discipline?
The friends, who include Aristophanes, Phaedrus and Socrates, decide that since they drank too much the previous night, on this occasion they shall pour out the wine only for refreshment, not for inebriation.
Dating the dramas of the Republic, Phaedrus, Protagoras, Symposium, Hipparchus, Lovers, Minos, Philebus, and Menexenus, among others, suffers from one or another of these problems.
Since the 1496 edition in which it appeared in this form, "the Phaedrus commentary" has meant the documents printed here: a general title, an argument divided into three chapters from the 1484 edition, a postscript for these three chapters, eight new chapters, a postscript, a new title, and fifty-three summae of varying lengths.
The oldest, of course, is Greek--Socrates's contrast in the Phaedrus between "living" speech and its written "image.
The references to these deities, along with the subsequent address to Phoebus Apollo ("o decus Phoebi," 13) in the fourth stanza, complete an enumeration of the four furors which, according to Plato in his Phaedrus (244c-245c and 264b), enable the mythic charioteer to penetrate and transcribe divine vision.
Lehrich first closely examines the longest extant Hermetic text, the Ascelpius, and, comparing it with Plato's Phaedrus, concludes that for the /Egyptian hierophant Thoth a certain plenitude, an unsundered connection between language and the divine, has given way to the reign of the written word with the subsequent loss of presence and certitude in the face of a history of inscription.
Plato, Phaedrus, translated by Robin Waterfield (Oxford Univ.
Socrates, in Plato's Phaedrus, was perhaps among the first, certainly the most prestigious, to doubt the virtues of reading and writing.
Plato's Phaedrus and Cicero's advocating of the integrative ideal in rhetoric and the implication of this ideal regarding the status of passion should dissuade imposing on either of them a simplified preference for reason.
When Plato walks with Phaedrus down the middle of the river toward the deep grass below the trees where they will talk, when Plato follows the beautiful young man who carries the scroll of Lysias' speech tucked within the sleeve of his robe, when Plato famed for his control, for his lack of passion, seems enflamed equally by the beauty of the boy and the intoxication of language, he asks an astounding question: "am I a monster more complicated and swollen than the serpent Typho, or a creature of a gentler and simpler sort, to whom Nature has given a diviner and lowlier destiny?