phenazine

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phenazine

[′fen·ə‚zēn]
(organic chemistry)
C6H4N2C6H4 Yellow crystals, melting at 170°C; slightly soluble in water, soluble in alcohol and ether; used as chemical intermediate and to make dyes.
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In conclusion, although encouraging results were achieved from using phenazines to control G.
Metabolism and function of phenazines in bacteria: impacts on the behavior of bacteria in the environment and biotechnological processes.
To identify the phenazine antibiotics from the selected UPMP3 strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and assessment of its antagonistic activity of Ganoderma boninense, three antibiotics phenazine (PHZ), phenazine-l-carboxylic acid (PCA) and pyocyanin (PYO) were extracted from the bacterial fermented broth using benzene and chloroform and detected through High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).
aeruginosa UPMP3 was cultured on King's B agar medium for 24 h incubated at 30 2C to continue the extraction and identification of phenazine antibiotics.
Extraction and Purification of Phenazine, Pyocyanin and Phenazine-l-carboxylic Acid
fluorescens to suppress soil borne fungal pathogens depends on their ability to produce antibiotic metabolites such as pyoluteorin, pyrrolnitrin, phenazine 1- carboxylic acid, 2, 4 diacetylphloroglucinol, hydrogen cyanide, kanosamine, pyocyanin and viscosinamide.
Extractions of Phenazine (Phenazine 1-carboxylic acid)
For Phenazine the extraction was done by acidifying the cultures with an equal volume of benzene (Phenazine in the benzene layer) and then extraction of the benzene phase with 5% NaHCO3.
The antibiotics such as crude antibiotics, 2,4-DAPG, phenazine and pyoluteorin by different strains of P.
Phenazines act like molecular snorkels, giving bacteria that are crowded or submerged in mucus access to fresh air, Dietrich says.
aeruginosa that make phenazines grow in petri dishes as smooth, shiny colonies.
The idea that bacteria can use phenazines to access essential nutrients, such as oxygen, is exciting, says Linda Thomashow, a research geneticist with the U.